Facebook execs discuss CES, trends in tech & ads

By Justin Lafferty Comment


As the tech world gathers in Las Vegas this week for the International Consumer Electronics Show, Jane Schachtel, global head of technology and mobile strategy at Facebook, and Patrick Harris, Facebook’s global director of agency development, wrote about what they expect to see at this year’s CES event.

Schachtel and Harris discussed CES, as well as upcoming trends in tech, in a Facebook for Business blog post.

Schachtel said that she’s looking forward to seeing how tech companies will use all of the recent innovations to make lives better:

Making the Internet of Things matter

There’s been a lot of talk about the Internet of Things the last few years — devices like Web-enabled refrigerators that can tell you when you’re running out of milk — but for the average consumer the Internet of Things only means a smart TV or fitness band. I’m eager to see how the biggest Internet of Things players are planning to integrate more of this innovation into people’s lives.

The need for brand differentiation

This will be the eighth year in a row that new smartphones will be announced at CES. This presents manufacturers with a great opportunity to differentiate themselves from one another. People don’t remember how many pixels a smartphone camera has, but they definitely remember that their camera takes awesome pictures of the beach at sunset. In a crowded and very competitive market, highlighting how these devices impact people’s lives can help separate brands from one another.

Here’s what Harris is expecting at CES:

Keeping pace with change

At CES it’s really easy to be lured in by the new, shiny objects. It can be overwhelming. For me, trial and error is key to keeping up with all the newness. I sometimes talk to clients about the 70/20/10 model. In any given year, 70% of your advertising efforts will be focused on your core strategies and channels, the places you spend most of your time optimizing and refining. Twenty percent is used for some really focused experiments on new platforms. And then 10% is saved for moonshots — things that have a low probability of working now, maybe because they’re very new or untested, but could have a big payoff down the road.

Big data → Big insights

Agencies are looking to simplify their insights practices to drive communications strategies and media priorities. It’s a shift from collecting everything to collecting the most meaningful insights.

Readers: What are you most excited for at CES this year?

Image courtesy of Kobby Dagan / Shutterstock.com.