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3 Things to Know About Donald Trump's SNL Hosting Gig

Controversial candidate will bring in viewers, whether they like him or not

Trump hosts SNL for the first time since 2004 this weekend

Donald Trump will host Saturday Night Live this weekend for the second time, but this will be very different than his 2004 appearance when he was a part of the NBC family as host of The Apprentice.

NBC dumped Trump in June, but the GOP presidential candidate is back at 30 Rock and will take the stage live from New York on Saturday night. And not everyone's happy about it.

While Trump is by far the most significant candidate to host the sketch comedy show in the midst of an active campaign, he isn't the first. Steve Forbes hosted while he was running for the Republican nomination in 1996, and Al Sharpton took his turn in 2003 while running as a Democrat.

Here are some 3 things to look out for on Saturday night:

1) An FCC Rule Could Mean Headaches for NBC Affiliates

A candidate cameo on SNL is par for the course, but usually it's no more than a skit, or a Weekend Update appearance, such as Hillary Clinton's turn as "Val the Bartender" on this season's premiere. But as host, Trump will be front and center throughout, and it could trigger an FCC rule regarding the amount of airtime candidates are allowed on non-news programs.

The FCC's equal time rule states that broadcast and radio stations must provide an equivalent opportunity to any opposing political candidates who request it. NBC stations could be forced to fork over a significant chunk of airtime as a result. Don't be surprised to see other campaigns adding up Trump's airtime and asking for an equal amount.

When Sharpton hosted during the 2004 campaign, several NBC affiliates refused to carry the episode for that reason.

2) It's Live, and Someone Might Want to Make a Statement

Trump's hosting gig has angered many people, particularly some in the Hispanic community, in the wake of his degrading comments about illegal immigrants. On Thursday, a coalition of Latino advocacy groups staged a protest outside NBC's headquarters.

The Hispanic Federation, the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) and the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) are planning to march from Trump Tower to 30 Rock ahead of the broadcast. A Latino Rights PAC called Deport Racism is offering a $5,000 "bounty" for any audience member who disrupts the episode by yelling out "Deport racism!" or "Trump is a racist!"

SNL is no stranger to controversy, and airing the show without the safety net of editing—it is live, after all—only further leads to the possibility that something unexpected might happen. It might not top Sinead O'Connor ripping up a picture of the Pope, but Trump is a combustible figure and there could be those who see an opportunity to make a statement.

3) NBC Will Do "Yuuuge" Ratings

Trump has already boasted that his hosting stint will result in massive ratings for NBC, and he's probably right. As the three Republican primary debates have proved, Trump brings in viewers whether they like him or not.

SNL's ratings have trended downward for a few years, though they usually perk up during a presidential race. The show still remains among the highest-rated on NBC, averaging a 2.0 rating among adults 18 to 49. Last February's star-studded 40th anniversary special proved the venerable late-night franchise can still be a big draw when everything comes together.

This will likely be one of those times.

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