Vanity Fair's 2011 'New Establishment' List Dominated by Tech Titans | Adweek Vanity Fair's 2011 'New Establishment' List Dominated by Tech Titans | Adweek
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'Vanity Fair' Releases Tech-Heavy 'New Establishment' List

Zuckerberg No. 1 for second year in row
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Vanity Fair has just released its yearly “New Establishment” list and, this time around, it’s dominated not by media stalwarts, but Silicon Valley tech mavens.

For the second year in a row, the No. 1 spot in VF’s annual list—it's made up of the top 50 men and women in “an innovative new breed of buccaneering visionaries, engineering prodigies, and entrepreneurs, who quite often sport hoodies, floppy hair, and backpacks”—was given to Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg (hence the hoodies).

The No. 2 spot is held by Google co-founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page, who were third in last year’s list. Rounding out the top five are Amazon’s Jeff Bezos at No. 3, followed by Apple’s Tim Cook and Jonathan Ive at No. 4, and Twitter and Foursquare founder Jack Dorsey at No. 5.

Other prominent tech names on the list, now 17-years-old, include Twitter’s Dick Costolo, Zynga’s Mark Pincus, Groupon’s Andrew Mason, Foursquare’s Dennis Crowley, and Spotify’s Daniel Ek. All Things D writers Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher also made their way onto the list, as did tech-savvy celebrities like Ashton Kutcher and Lady Gaga. Justin Timberlake inched in at the No. 50 spot—just 16 names behind his Social Network character, Sean Parker.

Of course, those tech whizzes wouldn’t be where they are without their financial backers, many of whom are also included on VF’s list. They include Andreesen-Horowitz’s Mark Andreesen and Ben Horowitz, Jim Breyer at Accel Partners, Michael Moritz at Sequoia Capital, and Greylock Partners’ Reid Hoffman.

This year, VF broke media’s not-so-newly established names into their own separate category, named “The Powers That Be.” Former Apple CEO Steve Jobs, to no one’s surprise, took the top spot, and was joined on the list by moguls like News Corp.’s Rupert Murdoch and Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer.