CEO Dick Costolo Talks About Twitter's Mobile Ad Platform At Economist Conference | Adweek CEO Dick Costolo Talks About Twitter's Mobile Ad Platform At Economist Conference | Adweek
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Twitter Touts Mobile Ad Platform

CEO, Costolo: Mobile revenue out-performs desktop some days
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At a conference hosted by The Economist Wednesday, Twitter CEO, Dick Costolo puffed out his chest much like like the company's recently modified bird logo as he spoke of Twitter's unique position in the mobile ad game. 

Costolo told the audience that Twitter thinks of their business primarily as an advertising platform and that the shared experiences about the events happening in people's lives on twitter lend itself to an advertising model. He went on to note that a small portion of thier business is a data licensing model, deeming licensing as a small niche focus for the company.

When it came time to talk about the ads, Costolo sounded confident that the social networking platform's mobile friendly character limit would help continue Twitter's mobile success. He even added that Twitter's nascent (launched in late March) mobile platform has out-performed the desktop service in revenue on specific days. "mobile revenue for us is already doing delightfully well; I couldn’t be happier with it," Costolo said.

Costolo added that the platform also keeps brands honest when it comes to promoted tweets noting that "brands have to take a Tweet that they’ve organically sent to their followers and then make it an ad, it’s fairly spam resilient because you don’t end up with companies wanting to send spammy messages out and lose free followers just so they can send this spammy message." 

Turning an eye toward of the future, Costolo noted that there was much still unknown and untested about Twitter's power to act as a predictive instrument to map possible global events, and even predict the movement of financial markets.

"My guess is you will see folks start to get better and better at using it to predict what is going to happen next or what markets will do next. I don't know that anyone has really figured it out yet."