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Super Bowl

Google Hopes Super Bowl Advertisers Choose It Over Twitter for Real-Time Marketing

Wix will test out YouTube's instant ads

Google looks to grab more social budgets during the Super Bowl. Sources: Getty Images, YouTube

Brands are notorious for pulling out all the digital marketing bells and whistles during the Super Bowl, and Google hopes to take a bite out of Twitter's reputation as brands' go-to platform for real-time marketing this year.

Today, Google launched a new ad format called real-time ads that lets brands trigger promos around big events like the Super Bowl and Oscars instantly, similar to how marketers use Twitter. The format includes inventory on YouTube and Google's Display Network, which is made up of thousands of publishers' sites and apps.

Advertisers first pre-plan and upload the creative they want to use and then can push out the content in real time. That's a bit of a difference compared to Twitter, where brands sometimes create and post content on the fly.

"The goal for marketers and being able to react real-time in a way that really resonates with folks around big cultural events and the micro-moments that go with them is common across many platforms," said Tara Walpert Levy, managing director of agency sales at Google, during a press event on Wednesday. "What's unique about real-time ads is the ability to do that in video and display with the reach and scale and power of the platform, which as you find out is relatively incomparable."

Super Bowl advertiser Wix has signed on to use the new YouTube ads during the Big Game. This is the second year that the website-development company has run a Super Bowl ad, which is being produced by Hollywood film studio DreamWorks Animation.

Wix's CMO Omer Shai recently told Adweek that this year's campaign will include a big digital push that extends the campaign beyond a 30-second TV spot.

"We're really happy with what we achieved last year—we did a great campaign, not just a spot," Shai said. "This year was almost a no-brainer."
 

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