Google Expands Its Brand Plans With Real-Time Results | Adweek Google Expands Its Brand Plans With Real-Time Results | Adweek
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Google Expands Its Brand Plans With Real-Time Results

Display vp discusses campaign measurements

Google is expanding its Brand Lift program that measures how online campaigns influence consumers, and it is sharing results in real time to help advertisers adjust on the fly, Google’s display vp, Neal Mohan, told Adweek. Brand surveys are now offered on nearly all video and display ad campaigns through Google, he said.

“Brand measurement in general is something we’ve invested in very heavily and something we’ve talked a lot about with advertisers and agency partners,” Mohan said.

Google launched brand surveys last year to gauge consumer sentiment around its advertisers. Brands like Oscar Mayer, Pepsi and MasterCard have tried the surveys. “Brand lift is no longer conjecture,” Mohan said. “We can actually give those insights into whether a video campaign is working.”

The brand question has always been one of Google’s—and the rest of the Web’s—blind spots, and Mohan said 84 percent of advertisers have said they would spend “significantly” more online if they had a better view.

For instance, Google is sharing how ads have affected search queries: whether users are conducting brand-related searches. The reports are coming back in real time so that the marketers can change messages based on what is working.

“We’re providing feedback as ads are being delivered instead of some survey that runs well after the fact when it’s too late,” Mohan said.

Mohan spoke today at the Digital Media Summit in New York. Here is a look at a couple of the Brand Lift results he shared:

Oscar Mayer
The hot dog maker ran a campaign called Wake Up and Smell the Bacon, with a heavy video component. Google said searches for the brand increased 1,000 percent and searches for its products were up 2,000 percent.

eHealth
Typically a direct response marketer, eHealth went with a “brand-building display” campaign, leading to 45 percent more brand-related searches.

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