Contently Introduces Magazine to Cover Content Marketing | Adweek Contently Introduces Magazine to Cover Content Marketing | Adweek
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Contently Introduces Online Magazine to Cover Content Marketing

Company plans to put out quarterly print edition

Contently is launching an online magazine focused on the very topic the company cares about most: content marketing.

The publication, which went live Tuesday morning, is called the Content Strategist, and Contently wants it to be an authoritative voice on the subject that can stand on its own, said Sam Slaughter, the company's vp of content.

Close readers of Contently's site may already recognize the name of the publication, which had existed as a blog for about two years. Redesigning and relaunching the publication as a magazine was a way to set the new product apart from its previous iteration, explained Slaughter.

"We want to make sure that as we relaunch, the things that we're doing are good enough to be in any publication anywhere," he said. "That means no more aggregation of other people's content. We're going to have authoritative voices writing for us, people across the content space, thought leaders. We're going to have experienced journalists coming in and writing pieces, longform, really, really in-depth analysis on trends in the industry."

Caroline McCarthy—who worked briefly at Quartz and at Google before that—will oversee the editorial efforts. Five to 10 writers from Contently's network will contribute regularly to the magazine, according to Slaughter, and the magazine will pay around $150 to $200 for a shorter piece and as much as $4,000 for a longform story.

"We were journalists when we started this company. We were really appalled at how little people pay writers for our work," Slaughter said.

Slaughter said he hopes to have about 10 to 20 articles published each week. And there are even plans to put out a quarterly print edition of the magazine, with the first issue slated to be published in the fall.

"We want to make sure we don't just cover what's happening, but why it's happening and why it matters," Slaughter concluded.

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