Barbara Fairchild Out at Bon Appétit | Adweek Barbara Fairchild Out at Bon Appétit | Adweek
Advertisement

Barbara Fairchild Out at Bon Appétit

Advertisement

Barbara Fairchild, the longtime editor of Condé Nast's Bon Appétit, will be replaced later this year after a 32-year career with the magazine, including 10 as its editor-in-chief, the company announced today.

Fairchild, who announced her departure to her staff today, will work on projects for the company in the future while pursuing outside opportunities. Along with her departure, the magazine’s editorial offices will move from Los Angeles to New York (where it shared space with Architectural Digest, whose move—and top editor replacement—also were announced recently).

“The move of Bon Appétit’s editorial headquarters to New York is part of the company’s continuing efforts to strategically align our brands for future growth and to enhance efficiencies and coordination by consolidating our assets,” company CEO Chuck Townsend said in an announcement.

Explaining Fairchild's departure, a spokesperson for Condé Nast said that when the company decided to move the magazine’s editorial offices from L.A., Fairchild wasn't prepared to move to New York and live there full-time.

The Fairchild news comes a few months after management changes at Condé Nast’s food brands, with Carol Smith assuming publishing responsibilities for BA and the brand extensions that remain of the since-folded Gourmet magazine.

Condé Nast has been making a round of top editor changes lately. In addition to AD, Lucky also just had an editor change, with Brandon Holley replacing founding editor Kim France.

With its closing of the luxury-oriented Gourmet last fall, Condé Nast moved to focus resources on Bon App, whose more mass appeal seemed a better fit for today’s cost-conscious consumers who are cooking and entertaining at home more. Condé Nast raising Bon App’s rate base guarantee 15.4 percent to 1.5 million effective this year.

Under Fairchild, Bon App has sought more mass audience appeal, adopting a friendlier logo with a recent redesign. But at the same time, it’s faced more competition for readers from newer food titles that emphasize accessibility and a casual approach to cooking, like Everyday Food, Everyday with Rachael Ray and Food Network Magazine.