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Adweek.com's Top 10 Press Stories of 2012

From Bloomberg to Reuters, from Larry Flynt to Anna Wintour

Matthew Winkler, editor in chief of Bloomberg News | Photo: Elizabeth Lippman

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Here are the 10 most-read press stories published on Adweek.com in 2012:
 

Grown-up Food Brands Are After Your Kids10

By Lucia Moses
Bon Appétit, published by Condé Nast, features a column called "The Providers" about being a working parent and cooking for the family. Food Network Magazine, a partnership of Hearst Magazines and the Scripps network, will take the idea one step further in September with a food magazine for kids.
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Hearst to Link Digital Editions With Amazon9

By Lucia Moses
Is it a magazine—or catalog? Magazines have been increasingly blurring the line between editorial and commerce, lending their names to products and shopping sites. Now, computer tablets and e-readers are making it more tempting to bridge that gap.
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Hearst Programs Its Brands for YouTube8

By Lucia Moses
Can print publishers hold their own in the unfamiliar world of high-quality TV? Hearst, one of the publishers that have signed on to YouTube's quality content push, will soon provide some answers with its two forthcoming YouTube channels.
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Secret Meeting Has 'Washington Post' Buzzing7

By Lucia Moses
Washington Post staffers are buzzing about a secret meeting between some 10 big-name Post journalists, including Dana Priest, David Finkel and Carol Leonnig, and Steve Hills, the president and gm of the newspaper. The April 17 meeting was highly unusual for two reasons—the executive editor, Marcus Brauchli, wasn't present, and the participants agreed not to talk about it.
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Tablets Helping Publishers Sell Back Issues6

By Lucia Moses
Here's some good news publishers probably didn't anticipate when they started selling their titles on the iPad. Digital subscription options are available to consumers, and single issues have turned out to be a good way of selling back copies of magazines, which has been cumbersome to do in print.
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Larry Flynt Offers $1M Reward for Mitt Romney Tax Returns5

By Emma Bazilian
It's no secret that Larry Flynt, the often-controversial founder and publisher of Hustler magazine, is not a fan of Mitt Romney. (Maybe that's because the Republican nominee has said that he supports federal obscenity laws—which aren't exactly good for Flynt's business.) It's also no secret that Romney opponents have been dying to get their hands on his unreleased tax returns, which, they claim, could prove that the candidate hasn't been paying his fair share of taxes. Now, Flynt is joining their cause by offering a $1 million reward for Romney's tax information.
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Irreplaceable You?4

By Lucia Moses
They shepherd the crème de la crème of Condé Nast's glossy magazines, wielding untold influence and earning substantial salaries. They have enviable budgets and top-flight talent at their command, their opinions are solicited, and their every word heeded. So why would Anna Wintour (Vogue), David Remnick (The New Yorker) and Graydon Carter (Vanity Fair) want to give all that up? Maybe they don't, now. But sooner or later, they'll have to.
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Hot List 2012: Print Winners3

By Adweek staff
"Hot" is, of course, relative. We reserve the designation for those media brands and media people thriving despite competition, market forces and that bugaboo of every business: the ever elusive consumer. Across weeks, we studied factors including advertising business, audience numbers, category supremacy, creativity, innovation, industry accolades and social buzz. We also invited you to chime in—and that you did, to the tune of more than 1 million votes. Now check out the winners—just try not to get scorched.
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Bloomberg and Reuters: The Future of News2

By Lucia Moses
Awash in subscriber revenue, Bloomberg and Thomson Reuters are those truly rare things: news organizations that not only are healthy but also are on a hiring spree. Bloomberg boasts about 2,400 edit staffers, up from 2,100 three years ago, while Thomson Reuters has added 600 full-time journalists over the past four years for a total of 3,000. Each employs more newspeople than The New York Times and The Washington Post combined.
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The 10 Most Controversial Mag Covers (Recently) Published1

By Melissa Hoffman
Sex sells. If it bleeds, it leads. There is value to shock—you don't have to be slinging dirt for TMZ to understand that. Some of the most controversial images ever printed didn't land on Penthouse or Hustler (though who can forget that lady-in-the-meat-grinder illustration?) but instead graced the covers of respected newsweeklies like Time and Newsweek, and magazines like Rolling Stone.
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