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Letters

  • December 11, 2000, 12:00 AM EST
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No Nonsense Campaign: The Sexism Wears Thin

Barbara Lippert hit it right on the head in her critique of the anachronistic No Nonsense pantyhose spot [Creative, Nov. 27].

Dredging up such destructive images as two women catfighting over a "whipped" man only reinforces the notion that creative nowadays seems lazy, superficial and—most of all—nonsensical. Not to mention the dude they're fighting over isn't exactly Kevin Costner (or even Homer Simpson).

To paraphrase Henny Youngman, if this is what it's come to, take my husband … please!

Elisa Cibrario

Creative director

Book-of-the-Month Club

New York

From Generation to Generation, The Kids Are All Right

Wow! I don't think I've ever been confronted with so evident a case of "woman in a plastic middle class bubble" syndrome as I was with Debra Goldman's column, which narrowly defined two "generations" through an analysis of two movies many generations apart: The Exorcist and Pay It Forward [Nov. 6].

Falling under the "Art & Commerce" banner, she shovels out the art and spoons us the commerce in order to make a pointless psycho babble point: scary, artistic horror pix from the '70s make boomers/X-ers bad, while commercial, manipulative pap from the moralistic new millennium makes "millennials" good. Good conquers bad.

Was nothing between 1973 and 2000 relevant? So many different types of movies from all different genres have sprung up during this period that one would think Goldman just awoke from a 27-year coma.

At 37, I've been influenced by a range of films over the years. The contrast is simply a futile attempt to connect two points that just don't connect. If there was some other message beyond that of a republican-mother-behind-a-desk, I didn't get it.

The kids are rooting for whatever the hot ticket is at the moment, whether it's South Park or Lion King, and the motivations are complicated—entertainment doesn't necessarily make kids good or bad. That's just the nature of our "consumer republic."

To say that Pay It Forward is representative of our next generation of children is ludicrous. To qualify it by blurring the lines between good and bad, both artistically and emotionally, is unconscionable.

Michael Carr

Presentation artist

Pittard Sullivan

Culver City, Calif.

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Barbara Lippert hit it right on the head in her critique of the anachronistic No Nonsense pantyhose spot [Creative, Nov. 20].

Dredging up such destructive images as two women catfighting over a "whipped" man only reinforces the notion that creative nowadays seems lazy, superficial and—most of all—nonsensical. Not to mention the dude they're fighting over isn't exactly