Y&R Brands Brings Dodgers to Irvine | Adweek Y&R Brands Brings Dodgers to Irvine | Adweek
Advertisement

Y&R Brands Brings Dodgers to Irvine

Advertisement

LOS ANGELES No sooner has the dust settled on a lawsuit concerning the "Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim" than the "Los Angeles Dodgers of Irvine" becomes a reality. In other words, the Major League Baseball club's new advertising agency is Young & Rubicam Brands, the shop confirmed.

The win comes after a rapid review with undisclosed contenders that began in December. It's the first account win under Rick Eiserman, who succeeded David Murphy as North American managing partner of the agency late last month.

"When Tagg Romney came in as the new [Dodgers] chief marketing officer from Reebok last December [Adweek Online, Jan. 17], he re-evaluated everything," said Eiserman, who celebrated victory with blaring rock, beer and ballpark peanuts at the Irvine, Calif., agency yesterday. "We were definitely the last agency through the door. We had to play on their timetable."

In a statement, Romney said Young & Rubicam Brands "stood out, demonstrating to us a clear understanding of our marketing and business goals, and bringing a consistent track record of delivering innovative ideas on behalf of its clients."

Regarding the Dodgers notoriously low advertising budgets, Eiserman said that Romney "has a better idea of what things cost, coming from Reebok. Just as they've gotten higher and higher talent to run their marketing, their idea of how to sell their seats is more sophisticated."

The first television work from the agency is expected to break March 15.

Eiserman, who still has his ticket stub and program from the 1988 World Series game in which the Dodgers' hobbled Kirk Gibson hit his dramatic home run, said that "considering the business set and brands here, the Dodgers are a nice addition to the agency."

Interpublic Group's Dailey & Associates, Los Angeles, was the incumbent on the account since winning a review that ended in September 2004.

The club spent $5 million advertising in 2005 and $3 million through November 2005, per Nielsen Monitor-Plus.