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WHAT'S NEW Portfolio

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OREOS
AGENCY: FCB/Leber Katz Partners, New York
CLIENT: Nabisco Biscuit, East Hanover, N.J.
MEDIUM: 30-second TV
CREATIVE DIRECTORS: Bob Neuman, Bob Phillips
ART DIRECTOR: Kitty Thorne
COPYWRITER: Katie Hennicke
AGENCY PRODUCER: Tony Macchia
PRODUCTION COMPANY: B.F.C.S., New York
DIRECTOR: Bob Brooks
This is the sort of thing that gives mawkishness a bad name. Teenage daughter arrives home, cheerily accuses dad of waiting up for her. He denies it, saying he couldn't sleep and felt like having an Oreo. He offers her one; she twists off the top wafer to get at the filling. Dad: 'You know, when you were little, I had to loosen them for you. . . . Now, well, you don't need, you don't need. . . . ' And his voice trails off as he looks away and gets teary-eyed. Daughter puts the top back on the Oreo, hands it to dad, who then re-loosens the wafer and hands it back to her. 'Thanks, daddy.' Sentiment is fine in measured doses, but this spot lays it on with a trowel. And the brand ends up looking presumptuous for claiming such a central (and tear-jerking) role in father-daughter bonding.
TAPE FLAGS
AGENCY: Martin/Williams, Minneapolis
CLIENT: 3M, St. Paul
MEDIUM: consumer magazines
CREATIVE/ART DIRECTOR: Bill Zabowski
CREATIVE DIRECTOR/COPYWRITER: Pete Smith
PHOTOGRAPHER: Peter Wong
Copy makes the link to the new regime: 'It's a big job, Mr. President, but no matter how big the problems are, Post-it Tape Flags are a quick, easy way to tab, color code and call out all the little points that might help frame a solution.' In case Clinton doesn't have a laser beam handy, he could use a Tape Flag to focus his attention on the economy. Actually, the ad seems better at being topical than at revving up our interest in the brand. If you weren't already familiar with the product, this ad wouldn't necessarily wise you up. And after a year or more of presidential campaign and post-mortems, there's something soporific about the list of public-policy issues that fills most of the page.
CIBA-GEIGY'S TORUS
AGENCY: Trone Advertising, Greensboro, N.C.
CLIENT: Ciba-Geigy Corp., Specialty Products group, Greensboro
MEDIUM: trade publications
CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Ron Irons
ASSOCIATE CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Hedgman Smith
ART DIRECTOR: John Sowinski
ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR: Amanda Jarrell LeBeau
COPYWRITER: Betty Brown Tompkins
PHOTOGRAPHER: Paul Dodge
ILLUSTRATOR: Greg King
The layout works in sync with the three-part headline to get your eye moving in a roughly clockwise direction, which gives you a tour of the catchy graphic elements and then deposits you at the beginning of the body copy. Copy itself gives a lucid account of why this particular product is preferable to the alternatives with which a reader in the insect-killing biz might already be familiar. Instead of lengthy boasts about the product's efficacy, the ad explains the broad range of applications for which the product is ideally suited. Thus, you get quite a sales pitch, but in an informational form that's less likely to trigger your sales resistance.
RINKER BOAT'S 236 CAPTIVA
AGENCY: Bonsib Inc., Fort Wayne, Ind.
CLIENT: Rinker Boat Co., Syracuse, Ind.
MEDIUM: consumer magazines
CREATIVE DIRECTOR/COPYWRITER: Dan Schroeter
ART DIRECTOR: Ellen McKinley
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Tom King (boat), Tom Galliher (product)
In positioning the 236 Captiva against the popular (but pricier) Cigarette line of power boats, this ad uses far more smoking imagery than you'd find in an ad for actual cigarettes, given the lifestyle orientation of that category's advertising. 'Warning: Once you stop smoking, it's hard to stop. Just throttle up a Rinker 236 Captiva and see how tough it is to kick the habit. . . . It's just plain addictive.' The peril in using so much tobacco-related language is that the ad will plant the Cigarette name all the more more firmly in readers' minds and link it, rather than the less-catchy Rinker moniker, to the excitement of power boating.
Copyright Adweek L.P. (1993)