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What's New: Portfolio

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Cherry Coke
AGENCY
Cliff Freeman and Partners, New York
CLIENT
Coca-Cola Co., Atlanta
MEDIUM
consumer print
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
David Angelo
art DIRECTOR
Taras Wayner
copywriter
Kevin Roddy
photography
Howard Berman
designer
Charles Anderson
As "different" slogans go, this campaign's "Do something different" lacks the ungrammatical ƒlan of Apple's "Think different." And while Apple's roster of luminaries suggests "different" means "better than the ordinary," Cherry Coke seems content to define it merely as "out of the ordinary." This is the sort of individualism that gives conformity a good name. With its virtuoso weirdness, though, the ad will appeal to the many people who'd answer such objections with a blunt: So what? In case you don't get the point of Bubble Wrap attire, the copy explains it. "People are drawn to Bubble Wrap like bugs to a speeding car's windshield. Take advantage of this newfound magnetism and mingle, baby." Another part of the ad compares the merits of different bubble sizes. And a disclaimer warns, "Excessive popping will cause premature deflation and an immediate loss of all benefits. Pace the pops." If nothing else, the offbeat humor gives personality to a brand that could use one. One catch: As is often the case with bizarre ads, the product is the least interesting thing here.

Carolina Herrera
AGENCY
Dente & Cristina, New York
CLIENT
Compar, New York
MEDIUM
consumer print
CREATIVE/art DIRECTOR
Barbara Dente
COPYWRITER
Donna Cristina
photography
Richard Avedon
Considering that it's adorned by a naked model, this ad is remarkably tepid. Such is the soporific power of perfume advertising's clichƒs. Actually, when people condemn clichƒs in general, they overlook the fact that some are better than others. An image can become a clichƒ because (until worn out by overuse) it captures something aptly. But other clichƒs are dull the day they're born. And that brings us to the well-worn conventions of the perfume genre, all of which are on display here. There's the portentous headline, the splashing liquid, the model who looks like she's lapsing into or coming out of a coma. It's not that we expect a perfume ad to say something intelligent. We do, though, expect it to give a clear signal as to which of the handful of perfume adjectives it embodies: "I'm the sexy one" or "I'm the romantic one" or "I'm the elegant one." With its collection of standard elements, this ad doesn't accomplish that task in a vivid way.

Edward Don & Co.
AGENCY
The Ungar Group, Chicago
CLIENT
Edward Don & Co., North Riverside, Ill.
MEDIUM
food-service trade print
CREATIVE DIRECTOR/copywriter
Tom Ungar
ART DIRECTOR
Michael Angus Franzese
photography
Tom Petroff
designer
Tracy Kuramoto
Don't look so smug. Maybe you'll have to do an ad for urinal screens someday. And you could do far worse than this one. Notwithstanding the product's function, a reader wouldn't want the ad to indulge too freely in "bathroom humor." But a thoroughly tasteful ad for urinal screens would seem absurd. With its allusion to the unspecified consequences of "quarter beer night," this one is just mildly tasteless. And that's about right for the occasion. Keep in mind that this client supplies all sorts of restaurant gear--"Everything but the food," according to the slogan. Thus, it doesn't want to be so memorably associated with bathrooms that restaurateurs will shy away from its other products. Deadpan copy loses no time in acknowledging that the reader has other fish to fry: "We realize that keeping track of urinal screens is not your number one priority." And what about delivery? "You'll be relieved to know that our people will make sure your orders are delivered when promised." Under the circumstances, the subtlety of this copy merits praise.

Yale-New Haven Hospital
AGENCY
Katsin/Loeb, San Francisco
CLIENT
Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Conn.
MEDIUM
30-second TV
CREATIVE DIRECTOR/copywriter
Jef Loeb
creative/ART DIRECTOR
Carlton Taylor
agency producer
Andrea Sanchez
production co.
Pavlov Productions, Culver City, Calif.
director
Marty Weiss
We're always more interested in ourselves than in some advertiser. That's one reason why healthcare ads seem so dull: The institutions are forever talking about themselves (boring) instead of talking about us (fascinating). This spot wins our attention by bringing a dose of lifestyle advertising to the category. The scene is a veterans' hall, where one guy tries to get his elderly pals going on the topic of their ailments. Isn't that the staple of senior-citizen discourse? Trouble is, these fellows don't have any ailments. The man practicing his golf stroke has no complaints about his knee. Asked how his "ticker" is, the guy building a model replies, "You know perfectly well it's fine." At the end, the grumpy protagonist laments, "We got nuthin' to talk about." A voiceover puts in its two cents: "We know that with a lifetime of the best healthcare, getting older doesn't have to feel like getting older." Sounds too good to be true. Still, the spot has given plausible human form to that idea, showing us people who seem able to enjoy old age--thanks, presumably, to preventive care. The matter-of-fact voiceover predisposes us to believe that Yale-New Haven truly does provide "the best healthcare."
WHat's New Submissions should be in the form of proofs, slides or (for TV spots) videotape. Please list creative director, art director, copywriter, agency producer, production company (and its location), director and illustrator or photographer. Describe the media schedule, including break date for the ad. Preference will be given to the newest work. Materials cannot be returned. Send submissions to:
What's New Portfolio, Adweek, 1515 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10036.