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V8 Juice
Agency: Fcb/Leber Katz Partners, New York
Client: Campbell Soup Co., Camden, N.J.
Medium: Consumer Print Group
Creative Directors: Sandy Greenberg, Terri Meyer Assoc.
Creative Director/Copywriter: Aryeh Wiener
Art Director: Jennifer Macfarlane
Photography: Robert Schlatter

If you're going to pull the rug out from under someone, it's nice to provide a soft landing. That's what this ad sensibly does. For people who don't eat right because (they claim) doing so is difficult, V8 takes away that excuse: Nothing could be easier than drinking V8 (with or without a glass) and getting a garden's worth of vegetables in the process. Even those who purport to find the nutritional pyramid unduly sphinx-like can't pretend that V8 is too exotic for their tastes. But the ad doesn't provoke the sales resistance of recalcitrant consumers by brow-beating them. Rather, it ingratiates itself by seeming to lampoon the health fanatics who do treat basic nutrition as the biological equivalent of rocket science. V8 stands on our side and not in the ranks of those who add mystification to a topic that can be so simple. As another V8 ad says, "you don't have to change your life. You don't even have to chew."

Joe Boxer Underwear
Agency: Odiorne Wilde Narraway + Partners, San Francisco
Client: Joe Boxer, San Francisco
Medium: Consumer Print
Creative Directors: Michael Wilde, Jeff Odiorne, Nicolas Graham
Art Director: Erich Pfeifer
Copywriter: Jim Lansbury
Producer: Sharon Kuerschner
Photography: Jock Mcdonald

When a campaign populates itself with people clad in nothing but underwear, it can afford to be relaxed about calling attention to itself. Thus, Joe Boxer's ads have the easy-going feel of a Norman Rockwell painting--albeit a slightly twisted Norman Rockwell painting. (Another shows a lumberjack in plaid briefs getting a trim from a barber in smiley-face briefs.) Ads aimed at the young and the brash often have an air of trying too hard. These don't. And, since they aren't frantic about grabbing attention in the first place, they can hold our interest with situations that require some decoding. How did the boy leave his shorts in that tree? Who knows? But the scene sustains the aura of mischievous fun that's at the core of this brand's appeal.