Trumpet Returns to New Orleans | Adweek Trumpet Returns to New Orleans | Adweek
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Trumpet Returns to New Orleans

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DALLAS Nearly six weeks after evacuating New Orleans to escape Hurricane Katrina, the Trumpet advertising agency returned to its headquarters at 839 St. Charles Monday with job openings and additional work, the agency said.

Trumpet founder Robbie Vitrano and other members of the staff have been working in space donated by Blattner Brunner/SRC in Atlanta. The host agency's co-managing director Frank Compton cleared office space for Trumpet as executive assistant Sylvia Fox helped find housing and other accommodations.

Despite the dislocation, Trumpet has continued reaching out to clients beyond its New Orleans base, Vitrano said.

"In the days following the storm, our people went to New York, Baton Rouge, Los Angeles and Atlanta to reassure our clients that Trumpet would not miss a beat," Vitrano said. "We didn't."

Vitrano said the agency has actually added clients and increased its workload since the storm. The shop is looking to fill five positions, ranging from office manager to senior account executive.

Though less dependent on hometown business than rivals Peter A. Mayer Advertising and Zehnder Communications, Trumpet built its image and reputation in the Crescent City that was inundated when floodwalls broke after Katrina hit shore.

"Our strategy from day one was to create a national presence, proudly living in New Orleans while building a diverse base of local and out-of-town clients," Vitrano said. "We're also grateful to be at the center of Louisiana's rebirth, working closely with our client Louisiana Economic Development, directed by Secretary Michael Oliver to quickly develop a communications strategy to support the thousands of Louisiana businesses displaced by the storm and to help them and the state get back to business."

New Orleans continues to show other signs of life in the wake of Katrina and a second hurricane, Rita. But city residents are keeping a wary eye on the Gulf of Mexico, where another potential hurricane, Wilma, was forming Monday.