Trumpet Goes Local for Nola Live | Adweek
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Trumpet Goes Local for Nola Live

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New Orleans Agency Touts Big Easy Internet Site in 17 TV Spots
NEW ORLEANS--Trumpet Advertising here breaks a $1 million campaign this week for the local Internet site owned by a branch of the Newhouse Group.
Nola Live is a city-oriented venue owned by New York's Advance Publications, which operates nine other Web venues covering 22 U.S. markets. Newhouse's local newspapers provide news content to the Web sites in each of the regions.
Trumpet produced 17 half-minute spots for Advance's first TV campaign in a local market. Produced by Gelpi Productions, with creative by Trumpet principals Robbie Vitrano and Pat McGuinness, the spots are supported by print, outdoor, online and radio. The campaign will run locally through the end of the year.
Trumpet representative Jim Gradl said the spots were shot with hand-held cameras--several ads have the floating horizons common to home videos--to appear candid and give them a "live" quality.
"Because our competition is national companies like Microsoft's MSN Sidewalk and Yahoo!, our edge is that this is a local site maintained by locals," Gradl said. "It goes beyond the superficial tourist attractions; it's a site for people who live here and want to know what's going on everyday, what's ingrained in the community."
The tag, "We're all over New Orleans," reinforces that idea.
Sprinkled with Trumpet's well-known knack for light humor, each spot focuses on a single scene, often zooming in and out on details, while a voiceover makes an often bantering connection to the locale. "City Hall," for instance, shows a street shot of the government center as the voiceover alludes to New Orleans' propensity for spicy politics: "If those walls could talk, they'd get a book deal. To find out what's going on in local politics . . . log onto nola.com."
Trumpet landed the $2 million Nola Live account last summer and launched shortly thereafter a small print campaign. When Mardi Gras rolled around last winter, the agency went national with a $500,000 print campaign that resulted in more than 28 million hits to the company's Web site during the week before Fat Tuesday.
That success led to work for Advance's corporate office, which has included print for system-wide functions such as the career counseling and classified sections on each site.