Advertisement

Trex: Building the Perfect Deck

Advertisement




Carmichael Suggests Synthetic Wood Is the 'Best of Both Worlds'
CHICAGO--The Trex Co. takes an aspirational tack in the first-ever consumer campaign for its prefabricated wood product.
The print and TV ads from Carmichael Lynch in Minneapolis downplay the synthetic aspects of the wood fiber and plastic decking product, and instead focus on how Trex can help you attain "your dream deck," said Andy Ferrari, executive vice president of sales and marketing at the Winchester, Va.-headquartered client.
The ads, breaking in April issues of home improvement, garden enthusiast and lifestyle magazines, and March 29 on national cable and syndicated TV stations, highlight the product's easy care and design capabilities.
"Very clearly Trex has some advantages that wood can't compare to," such as its ability to be molded and exposed to water without rotting or needing weather sealing, said Carmichael group account director Roman Paluta.
Print ads feature elaborately designed decks built with Trex that seamlessly mesh with natural settings, such as a stormy coast, a redwood forest and the Grand Canyon.
A headline encourages consumers to "Think outside the rectangle," while accompanying copy reads, "It's amazing what you can dream up when you're not busy sealing or staining."
TV and trade executions mimic the consumer print work.
The campaign is tagged, "The deck of a lifetime," which alludes both to the aspirational quality of the ads and the product's longevity, Ferrari said.
The company claims that in addition to the product's resiliency, it is also as workable as the finest grades of lumber, Ferrari said.
"It's the best of both worlds," he said. "We think of it as a new product, not as a faux wood."
Carmichael won the account last year in a review run by consultant Pile and Co. in Boston. Though the account was initially valued at $3-5 million, the company plans to spend $25 million on advertising and promotions over the next three years, Ferrari said.
Trex was used to build Toronto's Lake Ontario boardwalk and the Presidential trail at Mount Rushmore.