TLP Picks Up Tiger Electronics | Adweek TLP Picks Up Tiger Electronics | Adweek
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TLP Picks Up Tiger Electronics

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"Innovation and an edge" influenced Hasbro to award creative duties for its Tiger Electronics division last week to Tracy-Locke Partnership, the client said.

Mark Rosenberg, director of marketing at Tiger's Chicago headquarters, said both qualities figured in his selection of TLP over other Hasbro roster shops.

The maker of Furby, the robotic dog Poo-Chi and other best-selling, high-tech toys spent $20-25 million on advertising last year, per CMR. Media buying remains at MediaCom in New York.

TLP in Dallas has seen its Hasbro business grow dramatically since winning duties for a single brand, G.I. Joe, at the beginning of this year.

"[Hasbro] truly has become a substantial, kingpin account of the agency," said TLP chief creative officer Bob Chimbel. "It's got my whole creative and production staff energized."

Advertising for Tiger's toys was handled for 10 years by Posnick & Kolker, a nonroster agency located in New York. A desire to consolidate work among the roster shops sparked the review, Rosenberg said.

TLP has seen its production for Hasbro go from seven television spots this year to an estimated 40 for 2002. In addition to Tiger, the agency has slowly added several "boys" brands over the past year, including Transformer, Metabotz and Zoids.

In a year-end reshuffling of agency assignments, TLP last week was awarded the Pokémon brand and customer marketing duties for all Hasbro product lines, including those held by DDB in New York.

"The reason this is so exciting is that it's not just advertising," said Chimbel. "We're involved in new product development, package design and store displays—we literally do everything to own the brand."

The growth of Hasbro at TLP may prove a boon to local production companies too, as Chimbel is committed to shooting all the client's commercials in Dallas.

One of the reasons for that decision is talent. Chimbel said he finds New York and Los Angeles children "too polished." Shooting locally also provides a training opportunity.

"At a typical TLP shoot there are 20 people who are watching and learning and adding to the process," he said. "I couldn't do that if I had to fly those people to L.A."