ShoppingList.com Takes a Page From Its Own Book | Adweek ShoppingList.com Takes a Page From Its Own Book | Adweek
Advertisement

ShoppingList.com Takes a Page From Its Own Book

Advertisement




Comparison Shopping Site Weighs Shops for $15-20 Mil. Account
LOS ANGELES--ShoppingList.com, which bills itself as an "online resource for an offline world," is doing some comparison shopping of its own. The site is looking for an agency to handle its $15-20 million creative and media account. Bay Area agencies will have preferred shelf space on the consideration list, according to sources.
Incumbent DMNA, Palo Alto, Calif., will participate in the review. Select Resources International in Los Angeles is handling the search for the client.
The Sunnyvale, Calif.-based advertiser is a leading Internet site for up-to-date shopping information for bricks-and-mortar stores. The site provides price and promotion information for more than 400 product categories and 30,000 brands sold in more than 140,000 store locations around the country. Last month, the site was visited by a million shoppers for the first time.
Users can search for products by department, download coupons and rebates, read product reviews and get information on local malls, among other services.
Retailers whose stores are featured include Sears, Target, Wal-Mart, Fry's Electronics, Best Buy, Circuit City, Sam's Club, Home Depot, Macy's and J.C. Penny.
The client is looking for agencies with a track record of handling advertising for Internet brands as well as shops that have experience in the retail marketplace.
The company, which launched its site last August, named a new president and chief executive officer, Jeff Greenberg, in April.
The dot-com also recently announced a partnership with desktop PC vendor eMachines. Consumers who purchase a new eMachines PC can access ShoppingList.com via a key on the keyboard.
The online comparison shopping space, like most Internet arenas, is growing quickly. Internet research firm Jupiter Communications estimates that by 2005, U.S. consumers will spend more than $600 billion in offline channels as a direct result of searches conducted online. K