Reebok Defies Convention With New Campaign | Adweek Reebok Defies Convention With New Campaign | Adweek
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Reebok Defies Convention With New Campaign

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Reebok International will launch a global advertising campaign on Super Bowl Sunday tagged "Defy convention."

Eschewing the big game, a 60-second spot will break Jan. 28 during the premiere of CBS' Survivor II: The Australian Outback, which airs immediately following Super Bowl XXXV.

The commercial features many of Reebok's premier athlete en-dorsers, including Venus Williams (tennis), Allen Iverson (basketball), Jevon Kearse (football), Julie Foudy (soccer), and Steve Francis (basketball).

"'Defy convention' is a celebration of individuals who have defied the odds; people who encounter difficulties and find the wherewithal to succeed, despite those challenges," said John Wardley, vice president of brand communications for Reebok, Canton, Mass. "The campaign is also a celebration of the Reebok brand and our new innovative and stylish products which truly defy convention," he said.

The effort was created by Berlin, Cameron & Partners, New York, and will also include additional TV spots, print ads, point-of-sale materials, Internet executions and various retail and consumer promotions. Ads are scheduled to run in France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, the U.S. and the U.K.

Print executions will begin appearing in the March issues of national and international fashion and vertical publications, including GQ, InStyle, Self, Shape, Jane, Glamour, Details, Maxim and Entertainment Weekly.

Reebok International spent $30.9 million on ads in 1999, and $37.9 million for the first nine months of 2000, according to Competitive Media Reporting.

Reebok last year created a series of Survivor-themed ads that ran solely during that series. Those efforts featured fictitious characters Nate and Brian and the line "Want better advice?"

The client's principal operating units include the Reebok Division, The Rockport Co., Ralph Lauren Footwear and The Greg Norman Collection. Sales for 1999 totaled approximately $2.9 billion. Anthony Dixon / LFI