Redmond Boosting Aussie Budget As Webber Sets New Strategies | Adweek Redmond Boosting Aussie Budget As Webber Sets New Strategies | Adweek
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Redmond Boosting Aussie Budget As Webber Sets New Strategies

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CHICAGO-Redmond Products will boost spending by one-third in 1998 to $16 million to support new products and a new marketing strategy.
"Redmond has never wanted to be Procter & Gamble. It's always relied on innovation rather than size, and that will continue," said Charly Webber, president of Webber Advertising in Minneapolis. The agency has handled advertising for Redmond since 1984, when the client's lone product was Aussie 3 Minute Miracle conditioner. The Minneapolis-based firm now has nearly 40 products under the Aussie brand.
Redmond's advertising strategy for 1997 has been to focus on the teen market and promote its array of new styling products like Sprunch Spray. The company expanded its TV use with an upfront buy on NBC's block of teen-oriented Saturday afternoon programming, including Saved by the Bell. Ads adopted the tagline, "Ooo, what a roo can do for yoo," playing off the brand's kangaroo logo.
The teen-focused strategy has helped boost Redmond sales above 1996's $120 million, Webber said. But the strategy will be modified for 1998.
"We've boosted awareness among teens, but there are other, older demographics to talk to as well," Webber said. "Rather than work the same strategy again and again, Redmond has been aggressive and innovative."
Redmond, whose product introductions this year included DewPlex conditioner/styler and Slip Detangler, will focus its new product ads next year on a two-in-one hair and body cleanser, Webber said.
The $16 million budget will include about $5 million in TV spending-with KSL Media in New York handling buys-but the emphasis will continue to be on print ads.
Advertising for the entire Aussie line will be more product-focused, with a more unified brand image, Webber said. Photos of founder Thomas Redmond and his family in bathrobes, a staple of the company's earlier advertising efforts, are being downplayed.