The Pink Baskin-Robbins Spoon: A Confidante Of Tired Workers In Client's First Ads By Deutsch | Adweek The Pink Baskin-Robbins Spoon: A Confidante Of Tired Workers In Client's First Ads By Deutsch | Adweek
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The Pink Baskin-Robbins Spoon: A Confidante Of Tired Workers In Client's First Ads By Deutsch

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A pink plastic spoon as a pitchman and a new tagline make their debut in Deutsch LA's first work for Baskin-Robbins. The campaign, which breaks today, repositions the client as a place for a snack anytime, not just special occasions.
The pitchman/spoon is no ordinary utensil. It speaks to working people about taking a break from their stressful routines to enjoy a few moments with a $1.99 Baskin-Robbins sundae.
In one of four spots, a tired executive is seen in a subway car. "You gotta slow down, get to Baskin-Robbins," the spoon says from a vacant seat. The man replies, "Maybe you're right." The spoon reminds him: "I was right about those stock tips, wasn't I?"
Another spot shows a hassled office worker slaving over a report. The spoon offers to finish the report for him while he takes an ice cream break. Upon his return, the spoon says to the horrified salaryman: "I think I made it a little punchier." The tag: "Happiness served daily."
The two other spots will break in about two months. An estimated $20 million is behind the campaign.
It is the first time the client's famous spoons have been used in its ads. "It conjures all the warm feelings people have about Baskin-Robbins, but [with] a contemporary voice," said Mike Sheldon, general manager of Deutsch's new Marina del Rey, Calif., office.
The client's last spots, by D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles in Los Angeles, were tagged, "Where wonders never cease." Baskin-Robbins believes its main rivals are chains such as Starbucks and Noah's Bagels.