New Campaigns: Midwest | Adweek New Campaigns: Midwest | Adweek
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New Campaigns: Midwest

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Client: Arbor Drugs Inc., Troy, Mich.
Agency: Kolon, Bittker and Desmond, Troy, Mich.
Creative Director: Mike Daly
Executive Producers: Andre Bond and Marguerite Parise
Directors: Marty Lieberman and Brent Ramsey
Music: Trumpeter Norian, Chicago
Production Company: Bond Films North, Southfield, Mich.
A new campaign from Kolon Bittker Desmond for client Arbor Drugs includes spots that vary dramatically in style. Two directors were used to create the 10 30-second commercials. Marty Lieberman's two spots take a humorous approach in telling customers about the array of store-brand products at the retailer, which has more than 200 locations throughout Michigan. Those spots are complemented by the more emotional tack of Brent Ramsey's spots, several of which feature vignettes of Arbor shoppers and the retailer's new theme jingle, "Thinking of you, at Arbor." The campaign's onscreen tagline is "Arbor: Come see the difference." --Tanya Gazdik

Client: Melting Pot Foods, Austin, Minn.
Agency: BBDO Minneapolis
Creative Director: Denny Haley
Art Director: Karn Knutson
Copywriter: Bob Powers
Photographer: Marina Chavez
BBDO Minneapolis makes couscous fashionable with an outdoor campaign that broke last week in Minneapolis and Chicago for the Marrakesh Express brand. Using stylish photography reminiscent of a fashion ad, the campaign targets young urbanites who are seeking an easy, flavorful meal or side dish. Moving away from traditional ethnic food campaigns, which generally feature table shots and recipes, the campaign uses the product's artful packaging to highlight the difference and ease of the Marrakesh Express brand, said Denny Haley, the campaign's creative director. The artful photos and "What's your flavor?" tagline spotlight Marrakesh Express' diversity of flavors--from sun-dried tomato to mango salsa--and challenge the notion that couscous must be a bland, packaged-rice product. --Aaron Baar

Client: Baldwin Piano & Organ Co., Cincinnati
Agency: Sive/Young & Rubicam, Cincinnati
Creative Director: Michael Kitei
Assistant Creative Director: Mark Gambrone
Copywriters: Leanne Bryant, Andy Conroy
Art Director: Clifton Lin
Print Production Manager: George Noltensmeyer
Sive/Young & Rubicam aims for the heart of the connection between the musician and the instrument in this brand-image work for Baldwin Piano & Organ Co. The agency created a series of posters for the Baldwin and Chickering piano lines to be used as in-store advertising by Baldwin dealers. For the flagship Baldwin line, one poster plays to established musicians' respect for the brand. Copy on one poster concludes, "Because you love music. Because you always wanted one. Because it's a Baldwin."
Other posters play to the desire that parents and teachers of would-be pianists have to give their children or students the best. Copy for one such poster reads, "She needs a piano with a style that'll make her the center of attention. She needs a piano with a sound worthy of center stage. She needs a Baldwin."
--Scott Hume


Client: General Motors Cadillac Division, Warren, Mich.
Agency: D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles, Troy, Mich.
Executive Creative Director: Gary Horton
Art Director: Linda Meek
Copywriter: Lou Schiavone
Producer: Kristin Roberts
Director: Dana Christaansen
Production Company: Film Realite, Santa Monica, Calif.
The first '98-model Cadillac Catera spot, "Trilogy," focuses on the driving performance and handling of the luxury car, while retaining the slightly irreverent tone from the brand's launch campaign. The 30-second spot, set to the music of Patrick Hernandez's techno-pop song "Born to Be Alive," features a Catera outpacing a BMW 328I and a Lexus ES300. The vehicle's mascot, the animated red duck, only makes an appearance at the spot's close.
The duck will keep that role in two more Catera spots, which are now in production and set to break in December and January. The tagline remains "The Caddy that zigs." --Tanya Gazdik

Client: Lakeland Regional Health System, Benton Harbor, Mich.
Agency: Giggs/Gilmore Communications, Kalamazoo, Mich.
Creative Supervisor: Nancy Sturges
Art Director: Shelly Parkhurst
Copywriter: Andy Gould
Director: David Moe
Production Company: Setterholm
Production, Minneapolis
Beauty is much more than skin-deep, according to this campaign for Lakeland Regional Health System. A 30-second TV spot, outdoor ads and a series of accompanying print ads tell women that "Healthy is beautiful." The TV spot, which began airing this month, contends that "no matter who you are, when you're healthy, you're beautiful." One print ad plays off stereotypical notions of beauty, coupling a photograph of an unglamorous woman with the headline, "Forget Cindy Crawford and Tyra Banks. Check out Kathy O'Donnell." Biggs/Gilmore's creative focus on Lakeland's services for women, including mammography and nutrition counseling, developed from research showing women are most often the decision makers on healthcare services for a family. --Scott Hume

Client: DBI/SALA, Red Wing, Minn.
Agency: Clarity Coverdale Fury, Minneapolis
Creative/Art Director: Jac Coverdale
Copywriter: Michael Atkinson
Photographer: Vito Palmisano
Using striking images of the everyday hazards of construction work, this campaign stresses the importance of safety equipment to the people who use it. The series of trade ads and direct mailings to safety directors attempts to appeal to the macho side of construction work. Photos taken from the communications tower of Chicago's 100-story John Hancock Building are coupled with headlines like, "Gravity doesn't take breaks" and "Your knuckles should never be whiter than the gravity below you."
The tagline, "What the guys up there want to wear," was born from research that showed workers who don't like their safety equipment won't wear it. "This is the equipment those guys trust and prefer," said Jac Coverdale, the campaign's art director and creative director. Coverdale must trust DBI's product, too: He was wearing it while supervising the photo shoot at the top of the Hancock Building. --Aaron Baar