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New Campaigns

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Client: Hymie's Vintage Records, Minneapolis
Agency: Peterson Milla Hooks, Minneapolis
Creative Director/Copywriter: Joe Milla
Art Director: Mary Patton
Vinyl records have been obsolete long enough to become hip, and Peterson Milla Hooks isn't missing the trend. Old album covers inspired the typeface and style of this poster campaign for the don't-blink-or-you'll-miss-it Hymie's Vintage Records in Minneapolis. But the campaign's selling point hinges on the content of the classic platters in Hymie's collection. Though the store's owner is very selective about what he sells, offering various R&B, jazz, blues and early rock titles, it was the campier fare that caught creative director Joe Milla's attention. With a headline touting, "Original hits by the original putzes," one poster showcases an album by Steve & Edie. Another features an album by former talk-show host and singer Mike Douglas, with the headline, "And you thought Marilyn Manson was frightening."
Ensuring truth in the advertising, the records used in the posters were put back in the store's racks, said Milla, a self-proclaimed vinyl enthusiast who admitted to being "blown away" by the collection. Even if those particular records are sold, Milla isn't worried about finding suitable replacements for the next round of ads. "It will depend on what's there," he said. The posters will hang in bars, cocktail lounges, on college campuses and in other hipster hangouts. "We're going to be creative with the media," Milla said. --Aaron Baar

Client: Dairy Management Inc., Rosemont, Ill.
Agency: Leo Burnett, Chicago
Creative Director/Copywriter: Rory Monaghan
Art Directors: Bob Shallcross and Ben Hershey
Producer: Mike Antonucci
Director: David Kellogg
Music: Cliff Colnat Music, Chicago
Leo Burnett's first TV spot for Dairy Management Inc. was a seasonal effort, using humor and Santa Claus to reveal "the power of cheese." In the 30-second spot, which broke Dec. 11 and ran through the end of the month, a couple wakes up on Christmas morning to an eager daughter proclaiming, "Santa Claus came! Hurry!" Exchanging knowing glances, the parents enter the living room to find it filled with gifts--everything from a pony to a new sports car, almost obscuring the tree. The girl's father marvels at the haul, suggesting that the cookies the girl left for Santa must have been special. "I didn't leave him cookies," the girl says. "I left him cheese." The spot closes with the tagline, "Behold the power of cheese."
The campaign grew out of an 18-month consumer study of U.S. dairy consumption habits and will focus on consumers who crave cheese so much they eat it right off the block. "This particular campaign appeals to the person who loves cheese enough to get up and eat it in the middle of the night," said group creative director Rory Monaghan.
The campaign continues in February with five new TV spots and a series of print ads in consumer magazines. --Aaron Baar

Client: Target Stores, Minneapolis
Agency: Martin/Williams, Minneapolis
Creative Director: Lyle Wedemeyer
Art Director: Bryan Michurski
Copywriter: Chris Preston
Producer: Becky Enebak
Director: Tom DeCerchio
The towheaded boy last seen ringing doorbells to raise money for school in Martin/Williams' "Ding Dong" campaign for Target is back, and he's up to the same old tricks. This time, the bespectacled boy is washing cars at a school fundraiser. His bumbling antics and commentary about the gunk on windshields are intended to remind viewers that Target's Guest Card--which consumers can use to donate 1 percent of cash register totals to the school of their choice--is an easier way to support education.
In last year's TV spot, child actor Alan James Morgan charmed viewers with his nervous sales pitches for goods ranging from chocolate bars to birdseed, with the proceeds going to various school and extracurricular activities. In this spot, the boy is working at a school car wash, backing one car into another and soaking everything.
Bringing Morgan back for this sequel was a no-brainer, said creative director Lyle Wedemeyer. "He was very much a sensation in the first spot," Wedemeyer said, noting the commercial led to an appearance by Morgan on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. "He's just one of those guys that people have a good reaction to." The 30-second spot breaks this month. --Aaron Baar