The Loyal and Not-So-Loyal | Adweek The Loyal and Not-So-Loyal | Adweek
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The Loyal and Not-So-Loyal

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There's nothing like being a senior executive to make you feel good about your company. In a Walker Information survey of people who work full-time, 69 percent of senior-level managers said they would recommend their company to others as a good place to work. By comparison, 60 percent of supervisors/middle managers and 48 percent of rank-and-file employees said so. As you can see from the chart, women are better-disposed toward their employers than men are. This is the opposite of what one would expect in light of complaints about gender discrimination.Perhaps men are simply natural malcontents. Elsewhere in the study, Walker divides workers into three types. Twenty-four percent exhibit "true loyalty," feeling committed to thecompany and intending to stay at least two more years. Thirty-four percent are "at risk"—neither feeling commitment nor planning to stay more than two years. Then there are the "trapped" (37 percent), who expect to stay put at least two more years despite feeling no real attachment to the company.