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Just Asking

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No, I don't have a formulated code of ethics, but there are a lot of ethics that go into the work. My approach is to not force the wrong work on people. It's our responsibility to make sure we do the right thing and not the big shiny thing that will win awards. We are here to move products for our clients.

A personal code of creative ethics? That sounds like pretty serious stuff. I don't think I have one. But I do have one simple rule: Be original. Isn't that what it's all about? I just can't steal ideas or ways of thinking about things. If I did, I'd feel kinda sick inside, like a fraud. Never create work that resembles somebody else's. You owe it to the client and the people who work at your agency to do great work, and to make sure it's original work. I think it happens more often now than when I started my career, people saying "I wasn't aware," so somehow it's permissible.It's the "Can I look my kids in the face and tell them not to lie, cheat or steal if daddy condones lying, cheating and stealing at work" code. And I don't want to forget the "It's reprehensible to cloak oneself in plausible deniability and leave eager-to-please underlings to take the fall" part of the code either. The latter is something Ms. Seifert's bosses quite possibly neglected to follow. I guess my personal code is to just try and do the best damn job you can. And that's about it. All the best ads are based on truth anyway, so if you stick to trying to find the most human truth you can for a brand, you're in good territory, most of the time.