Jamba: More Than Just A Juice Bar | Adweek Jamba: More Than Just A Juice Bar | Adweek
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Jamba: More Than Just A Juice Bar

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Initial Effort From Butler Positions Chain As Part Of A 'movement'
SAN FRANCISCO--Butler, Shine & Stern last week launched its first work for juice bar chain Jamba Juice, with radio and outdoor ads focusing on the healthy, low-fat benefits of the client's food and beverage products and on the mind-set of its customers.
"Jamba is more than just smoothies," said John Butler, the Sausalito, Calif., agency's creative director. "It's bigger than that. It's a movement. It's a celebration of feeling good inside and outside. It's a way of eating, being and thinking."
Several of the colorful outdoor ads quote so-called "Jamba-isms" such as "Your body is a temple. Littering is strictly prohibited." One ad also features a cartoon muscleman flexing his biceps. In lieu of a tagline, the outdoor boards all use the client's logo--the words "Jamba Juice" linked by a cyclone icon.
"We asked Butler, Shine & Stern to help us establish an emotional connection between consumers and Jamba Juice," said Chris Strausser, vice president of marketing for the client. "In our initial effort, we want to go beyond products and focus more on the lifestyle our customers aspire to and practice."
The agency's radio campaign also portrays the client's customers as devotees of healthy living, and refers to Jamba's smoothies as "the perfect meal in a cup." One 60-second spot features a motivational speaker instructing a group of wanna-be Jamba Juice drinkers in a drill sergeant style: "Welcome Jamba candidates. Please repeat after me: I pledge to live a healthier life. I will get more exercise. I will wear my sunscreen and my seat belt. And I will visit Jamba Juice regularly."
The campaign, which continues through September, mainly targets California markets, although the radio ads are also airing in Denver, where the client opened three retail outlets in March and has since added three more units, according to Strausser.
Radio spots promoting the client's nonbeverage products are now in production, he added.