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HHCC Shuffles Again

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On the verge of finalizing a deal to buy what chairman Jack Connors would only describe as a Boston-based company, Hill, Holliday, Connors, Cosmopulos again shifted the responsibilities of two top executives.
June Blocklin, who had overseen the agency's new business efforts, becomes director of client services, working with president and chief creative officer Fred Bertino. She takes over for Brian Carty, who assumes Blocklin's day-to-day oversight of the business development team and takes on a new role as a liaison to New York-based parent the Interpublic Group of Cos.
Together, Blocklin and Bertino will run advertising, which Connors said accounts for about 55 percent of Hill, Holliday's overall annual revenues of $108 million. All nine account directors report to her; she, in turn, reports to Carty.
A member of the so-called Vermont Group, from which Connors has said he will choose a successor, Carty has for the last five years run new business and managed financial services accounts and human resources. Prior to Hill, Holliday, he was an executive recruiter and former chief of staff at Coopers & Lybrand. "Brian is an integral part of our team," Connors said.
Blocklin, an executive vice president, has been on a fast track since joining the shop from Young & Rubicam in New York late last year. In April, when Carty took on the role of director of client services, Blocklin was given new business duties as well as oversight of the $100 million Fidelity Investments account.
As for the upcoming acquisition, Connors said it is his intention to become "a diamond among jewels" in the IPG crown. "We've spent a year getting to know each other. Hill, Holliday is a brand with leverage and we intend to try a few things that are uncharacteristic," he said.
The Boston-based shop has grown organically for much of its 31 years, with its few acquisitions, including Altschiller & Co. in New York and The MSP Group in Framingham, Mass, designed more to beef up capabilities than to add bulk.