FCB Unveils Hidden Value of Dockers' New Khakis | Adweek FCB Unveils Hidden Value of Dockers' New Khakis | Adweek
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FCB Unveils Hidden Value of Dockers' New Khakis

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From the outside, Dockers' latest khaki pants don't look much different. But in the pleats and seams of the new Mobile Pants, there's more than meets the eye.

A new campaign from Foote, Cone & Belding, San Francisco, introduces the latest innovation in khakis: hidden pockets, including a zip-vault slot within the right-leg mesh pocket and two deep stowaway seam pockets designed for carrying high-tech gadgets.

A 30-second TV spot, titled "X-Ray Specs," breaks on network and cable Aug. 13. Print ads will launch in national publications Aug. 20.

Dockers spent $35 million on ads in 2000, per CMR. In the first five months of 2001, the San Francisco-based clothing retailer spent $15 million. Spending for this new set of ads was undisclosed.

FCB's challenge was "to come up with a way to visually demonstrate invisible pockets," said Brian Bacino, svp and group creative director. "It's the first time we've catered around a specific product in the 'Nice pants' campaign."

"X-Ray Specs" is the fourth spot since the relaunch of "Nice pants" last year. The spot has a waitress scanning a restaurant through X-ray glasses. One happy eater is oblivious to a tape recorder whirring in his companion's purse. As he gabs away, the waitress' voiceover says, "He's so busted." Another man has women's underwear on beneath his suit. The voiceover chirps, "He's got issues." Lastly, a cell phone rings. The camera pans to a handsome man in Dockers as he pulls his mobile out of his oversized mesh pocket. In his other side pocket is a handheld computer. "Nice pants," the waitress says.

"In the past, people didn't have anywhere to hold their gadgets except on a belt loop," said Maureen Griffin, consumer marketing director at Dockers. "The new pants fill a need that many consumers didn't even know they had."

Griffin said this is the first big innovation in the category since wrinkle-free khakis. "We wanted the campaign to be just as innovative as the product itself," she said.