FCB Previews Coors Light Spots | Adweek FCB Previews Coors Light Spots | Adweek
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FCB Previews Coors Light Spots

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CHICAGO Unlike the past few years, Foote Cone & Belding had the stage to itself when general-market Coors Light advertising was previewed at this week's annual Coors distributors conference.

Spots from the Interpublic Group shop in Chicago using the tagline "Taste the cold" were shown, as were African American-targeted commercials from Carol H. Williams Advertising in Oakland, Calif., and Hispanic work from Publicis Groupe's Bromley Communications in San Antonio. The "Taste the cold" line continues the brand's positioning.

FCB previously shared Coors Light with IPG's Deutsch/LA, but earlier this year that agency was pulled off the brand and told to focus on low-carb Aspen Edge [Adweek Online, Feb. 23].

The Golden, Colo., brewery spent $120 million in measured media on Coors Light last year, according to Nielsen Monitor-Plus, the bulk of its total ad spend of $160 million.

According to Coors, upcoming work from FCB includes two spots in which a beer drinker's "Ahh" reaction to guzzling a Coors Light is misinterpreted to humorous effect. In one ad, the guy is mistaken for an obscene phone caller by a woman he recently met; in the other, his gasp occurs as his girlfriend's mother climbs out of a pool."

Another new spot shows a train loaded with Coors Light, and features a cameo by Ice T. The O'Jays hit, "Love Train," is featured as the soundtrack.

A spot supporting a promotion for free music downloads shows a man clearing Coors Light bottles from tables at a bar. Patrons think he's a busboy, but in fact he's collecting the bottles to win the downloads. Coors chairman Pete Coors is featured in four spots, extolling the beer's virtues, with a version of John Denver's "Rocky Mountain High" playing as background.

Spots from Bromley, tagged "Asi de fria" ("It's cold like that"), show Coors Light cooling off hot situations such as a dance floor, a Mexican bar and an urban rooftop. A spot from Carol H. Williams is set in an urban dance club.