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Epson Engages Consumers In Detail

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DDB Ads Urge Readers To Explore New 1440 DPI Printers' Output
LOS ANGELES--DDB Needham is breaking a national print campaign for Epson America that illustrates the clarity and detail offered by its new high-end ink-jet printers.
The campaign is DDB's first for the client since winning the estimated $30 million account in February. Similar in concept to ads introduced last fall by Epson's previous agency, Ammirati Puris Lintas in New York, the new work communicates the message that "without an Epson printer, you're missing something."
"We look at this as an evolution of [last year's] campaign," said Jeffrey Marks, director of marketing communications for the Torrance, Calif.-based company. "Through research, we discovered we have a lot of equity in the campaign. We wanted to take it to the next level, which shows the printer's applications."
One of the new ads shows a gnarled tree trunk. A closer look reveals images of dancers hidden in the trunk and branches. Readers are encouraged to count the dancers. The copy reads, "With other printers, you might see how well these dancers blend in. But with ours, you see how much they stand out." The tagline remains, "You've got to see it in Epson color."
Two ads will break in September issues of consumer and computer enthusiast publications. A third will break early next year.
"People get involved with the ads," said Rick Carpenter, managing director and chief creative officer at the Los Angeles agency. The goal of the campaign, he added, is to show the superior output of the new printers--the first ink jets to offer 1440 dots per inch (dpi)--and what they can do for the user in terms of creating clearer copies.
Spending for the campaign was undisclosed. Epson America, an affiliate of Japan-based Seiko Epson Corp., spent roughly $32 million on ads last year, and nearly $6 million during the first quarter of this year, according to Competitive Media Reporting.
APL resigned the account last November, saying it was "unable to reach a new financial agreement" with the client. --with Tobi Elkin