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Dow Jones Unveils Second Web Site

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BOSTON-Dow Jones last week introduced a Web site targeting business users. The no-cost offering is separate from its subscriber-based Wall Street Journal Interactive edition. Both are promoted by Arnold Communications in Boston.
The new site (www.dowjones.com) was officially launched in newspaper ads last week, a day after a telephone press conference was coordinated by Boston-based Miller/Shandwick Technologies, which handles public relations chores for Dow Jones.
A full-page execution in The Wall Street Journal shows a computer monitor displaying a letter that reads, "Dear one-size-fits-all search engines. Your services are no longer required." The letter is signed, "Sincerely, dowjones.com."
Body copy below the letter explains that the site "delivers only top-quality, targeted business news, information and resources." It is not a news-oriented site but will serve to "aggregate" content useful to business people as the "all business" search engine.
Budgets were not disclosed but Jessica Perry, general manager of Dow Jones Interactive, said it would be significantly more than what was spent to launch the Wall Street Journal Interactive edition because the new site seeks to reach a broader audience of business users.
Print ads, running through the end of the month in various business, general interest and vertical publications, are coupled with a drive-time radio campaign in major markets. A television component is scheduled to appear this summer.
Package deals coupling both sites are being offered to advertisers, and different levels of sponsorship are available. The new site features 29 industry channels, any one of which can be targeted by a single advertiser. IBM, for example, sponsors the consulting portion of the site. Other charter sponsors include Equant, Fidelity Investments and Qwest.
At Arnold, both accounts are managed by Ken Umansky, managing director for technology business. Circle.com, the interactive arm of Arnold owned by parent company Snyder Communications in Bethesda, Md., also played a role in the development of the campaign. Arnold won the Wall Street Journal Interactive account earlier this year. ƒ