D'Arcy to Link Crest Brands in New Franchise Effort | Adweek D'Arcy to Link Crest Brands in New Franchise Effort | Adweek
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D'Arcy to Link Crest Brands in New Franchise Effort

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New YORK—D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles is launching a new campaign for Procter & Gamble's Crest that links the toothpaste to its two new line extensions and unveils a packaging change, the client said.

The TV and print campaign breaks June 3 with two 15-second spots linking Crest products launched in 2001—Crest White Strips and Crest Spin Brush.

The work is the last for Crest before worldwide chief creative officer Lee Garfinkel supervises a new overall campaign on the brand, sources said. The agency is readying for a late May creative presentation to P&G that ties all the products to the main brand, sources said.

"The overall direction is to do a full campaign for Crest in terms of its look and feel," a source said. "Each product should feel like it's coming from the same company."

Crest recently changed its packaging from white to blue, and the two upcoming spots are also designed to announce the change to consumers.

The first spot opens on a package of Crest Dual-Action whitening toothpaste on a bathroom window sill at dawn. The sun rises, lighting the package and hitting the starburst design that bears the Crest name, changing the white box to blue. The scene is repeated against different backdrops—city landscape, country setting—that feature the different products—Spin Brush, White Strips, etc., as a female voiceover says: "From Beantown to Downtown, from Broadway to Jasper Road, Crest is making things a little brighter. Now everything you need for a great smile has a bright new look."

D'Arcy has handled the $100 million Crest account since 1955.

P&G's Crest representative Bryan McCleary noted that since the launch of White Strips and Spin Brush in 2001, each brand has had $200 million in sales.

The last Crest toothpaste campaign from D'Arcy, tagged "Open up and smile," broke in April 2000 and showed close-ups of real people and their healthy, but less-than-perfect teeth.