Cleveland Clinic Pens 'Letters to Tomorrow' | Adweek Cleveland Clinic Pens 'Letters to Tomorrow' | Adweek
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Cleveland Clinic Pens 'Letters to Tomorrow'

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BOSTON The Cleveland Clinic has launched "Letters to tomorrow," a campaign based on patient experiences.

The work from Interpublic Group's Hill, Holliday, Connors, Cosmopulos in New York focuses on the things patients look forward to once their treatment is completed.

One print execution presents a letter from an aneurism patient written to "Anyone eyeing my corner office." The text continues: "Don't even think about it. And don't play with any of my desk toys. I'll be back next week. Stronger than ever. And if anyone's been sitting in my new Italian leather chair, there'll be hell to pay." The ad shows the chair.

Another ad showing a bicycle takes the form of a hand-written wish list (rendered in crayon) from a boy struggling with epilepsy. After his recovery, he looks forward to gifts such as a new bike and skateboard.

Patient-focused ads have become the norm in hospital advertising of late. Last month, the Detroit Medical Center promoted itself by offering a money-back guarantee. Ads by IPG's McCann Erickson asserted that patients who are not completely satisfied with their care would be reimbursed up to $100 [Adweek Online, May 25].

"By asking Cleveland Clinic patients to write letters to the one thing they're looking forward to after their procedure, we're asking them to believe in themselves and to assert their passion for life and the best medical care available, whatever condition they're facing," said Alon Shoval, executive vice president and creative director of Hill, Holliday in New York.

This marks the agency's first campaign for the Cleveland-based clinic since it won the account last October.

TV and Web elements are also in the mix. The client will spend about $10 million this year on ads.

Past work by independent Doner in Southfield, Mich., employed the tag, "Every life deserves world-class care," created by BBDO seven years ago. Doner's ads utilized statistics to convey the clinic's place among America's top hospitals.