Chevy Gets Selective With Tagline | Adweek Chevy Gets Selective With Tagline | Adweek
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Chevy Gets Selective With Tagline

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Bow Tie Icon to Cover in Some Ads; Jingle Retooled for 3 Models
DETROIT--General Motors' Chevrolet division has used "Genuine Chevrolet" as the tagline for its cars for almost four years, but the line is notably absent from a new divisional TV spot.
The 60-second spot, "American Snapshots," ends with the Chevrolet bow tie emblem and a voiceover: "Wherever America's going, we'll be there." The ad was created by Campbell-Ewald Advertising, Warren, Mich., Chevrolet's national agency. Media is placed by GM Mediaworks, also in Warren.
The "Genuine Chevrolet" tag will now only be used "as we see appropriate," said Jim Jandasek, Chevrolet's advertising/promotions director for passenger cars. "It's a sizable graphic element when you put all those letters together. Sometimes it doesn't work as well as just the bow tie."
Chevrolet spent $556 million on advertising through the first 11 months of 1998, according to Competitive Media Reporting. Of that, $228 million went to car advertising.
The spot, which features a new rendition of the "See the USA in Your Chevrolet" jingle popularized by Dinah Shore in the 1950s, debuted last week during the Grammys. It will air through mid-May on network and cable TV and reappear in December for the millennium, Jandasek said.
The commercial features historic American images interspersed with shots of Chevys through the decades. Digital editing made it possible to add Chevrolets to the famous pictures, said Bill Ludwig, Campbell-Ewald's chief creative officer.
Folk/pop singer Shawn Colvin recorded the new version of the jingle, but renditions by other singers in different musical styles are planned, Jandasek said. "We can tailor this to everything from a pretty hard punky rock to whatever appropriately matches the positioning," Jandasek said.
The jingle will only be used for the Impala, Malibu and Cavalier models, Jandasek said. Monte Carlo advertising breaking in October will not feature the music, he said.
The work is part of an effort to put GM's biggest division back on top in sales--a position it hasn't held since the Celebrity was the top-selling vehicle in 1984.