Brita Opens Taps for Faucet Filter | Adweek Brita Opens Taps for Faucet Filter | Adweek
Advertisement

Brita Opens Taps for Faucet Filter

Advertisement




Y&R, Not Long for Account, Crafts a $15-20 Mil. Product Debut
LOS ANGELES--The Brita Products Co., maker of home water filtration systems, has unveiled its first TV ads in a major fall marketing push tied to the launch of its Ultra Faucet Filter.
The estimated $15-20 million campaign via Young & Rubicam, San Francisco, includes national promotions, print and radio ads and TV spots tilted heavily toward prime-time programming. It's one of the agency's final efforts for the subsidiary of Clorox, Oakland, Calif., which is consolidating its entire $205 million account at DDB by year's end [Adweek, Aug. 9].
"It's our biggest-ever new product introduction," said Brita president Charlie Couric. "Our entry into the faucet filter segment is a major step for the category and clearly warrants placement on high-impact shows."
Two TV spots, narrated by actor Peter Coyote, show water flowing in natural environments. "Water Reborn" opens with a visual of lightning followed by rain, symbolizing the birth of water. Its rebirth is then depicted as it flows from a Brita Ultra Faucet Filter.
A second spot, "Perfect World," positions the product as a way to reclaim natural purity.
"In a perfect world, water is untouched," says Coyote in a voiceover. "In the real world, you'll want the new Brita Ultra Faucet Filter. It removes all these impurities, bringing clean, fresh water to your world." The tagline is, "Brita. Tap water transformed."
"The birth of water is a perfect analogy for this new product introduction," said Perry Portugal, copywriter on the ads.
The spots will continue to air days and evenings through the holiday season. Two-page, full-color print spreads featuring the filter are running in the October issues of such publications as People, Good Housekeeping, Better Homes and Gardens and Fitness.
Portugal teamed with art director Tom Peck on the spots. Stephen Creet was the creative director, and Stephen Kay produced.