Bozell to Help CBOT Weigh All Its Options | Adweek Bozell to Help CBOT Weigh All Its Options | Adweek
Advertisement

Bozell to Help CBOT Weigh All Its Options

Advertisement

The Chicago Board of Trade next month will launch one of its largest advertising efforts in recent years with a print campaign from Bozell here touting the arrival of futures contracts and options trading on the Dow Jones Industrial Average.
The work is simple, with minimal copy, because the target audience is quite aware of what's going on, says David Wojdyla, executive creative director at Bozell.
"We are speaking [in the print ad] to an educated investor," Wojdyla explained. "We didn't have to explain the product."
Bozell got the assignment from its CBOT client following an announcement in June that the Dow Jones Industrial Average would be available on its trading floor this fall.
The Dow Average consists of 30 blue-chip stocks and is widely used as an indicator of market conditions. Trading pegged to the Dow Jones Industrial Average's fluctuations now can be done at the CBOT.
The creative team of Geoffrey McCartney, copywriter, and Dick Tracy, art director, didn't have to get fancy, knowing they were speaking to a savvy crowd. The print work consists of a worker attaching a Wall Street sign on a pole already holding a sign marked South LaSalle Street, where the CBOT is located.
The ad for the Chicago Board of Trade merely announces availability of the new market, with a telephone number to call for further information. Copy reads: "For the first time ever, trade the index at the exchange."
The work will cover a wider media swath than has previous CBOT advertising, with space planned for The Wall Street Journal during the week of Sept. 15, Barron's and Forbes magazines the week of Sept. 22, and Business Week, Financial Times and Individual Investor in October. That's in addition to more arcane publications such as Futures and Derivatives Strategy.
The CBOT is the world's largest futures and options exchange, with 3,600 members who pay up to $575,000 each for a seat on the board, which gives them the privilege of trading financial and agricultural products.