Maybe nostalgia generally isn't what it used to be, but this ad does an awfully good job of positioning Miller High Life as the link between past glories and present-day " />


Maybe nostalgia generally isn't what it used to be, but this ad does an awfully good job of positioning Miller High Life as the link between past glories and present-day " /> The best ads <br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>Maybe nostalgia generally isn't what it used to be, but this ad does an awfully good job of positioning Miller High Life as the link between past glories and present-day | Adweek The best ads <br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>Maybe nostalgia generally isn't what it used to be, but this ad does an awfully good job of positioning Miller High Life as the link between past glories and present-day | Adweek
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Maybe nostalgia generally isn't what it used to be, but this ad does an awfully good job of positioning Miller High Life as the link between past glories and present-day

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MILLER HIGH LIFE
AGENCY: The Mingo Group, New York
CLIENT: Miller Brewing, Milwaukee
CREATIVE DIRECTOR:Allan Corwin
ART DIRECTOR: Geoff Edwards COPYWRITER: Colin Costello
PHOTOGRAPHER: Michael Raab
The line of copy under the headline: "Some of the biggest, orneriest fighting fish in all the world can be found in our waters. And that's not bending the truth." On the other hand, truth-bending is not least among the sport fisherman's skills, so the ad's own exaggeration quickly creates a rapport between client and reader. And if the state's tourism office isn't above telling a fish story, this suggests a down-home quality to the place that anglers and non-anglers alike will find inviting. You can catch a fish in any state of the union, but fishermen want to vacation someplace where their sport is an honored pursuit. The wry humor of the ad lets them know they'll find North Carolina a congenial venue, as well as a likely spot for catching a mega-fish.
NORTH CAROLINA TRAVEL & TOURISM
AGENCY: Loeffler Ketchum Mountjoy, Charlotte, N.C.
CLIENT: North Carolina Division of Travel & Tourism, Raleigh
CREATIVE/ART DIRECTOR: Jim Mountjoy
COPYWRITER: Ed Jones
PHOTOGRAPHER: Marvy!
Ads that employ feminist themes for selling things to women tend to be pretty inept at it. This one is an exception, playing the game with skill and subtlety. Picking up on the photo, copy recalls the bad old days "when your mother had to pretend she was satisfied with a watercress sandwich" and "Ladies who lunched, didn't." The ad then lumps those dowdy ladies together with modern women who "fast on rice cakes." Thus, spartan self-denial is transformed from an avocation of health-conscious '90s women into an artifact of ladylike servitude. The ad doesn't pretend Lean Cuisine is the most delicious food imaginable, so you're disposed to accept the more modest claim that it's quite tasty enough-- especially considering it's not Fat Cuisine.
LEAN CUISINE
AGENCY: Tatham Euro RSCG, Chicago
CLIENT: Stouffer Foods, Solon, Ohio
EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Judith Werme
ART DIRECTOR: John Linesch
COPYWRITER: Karen Wallisky
PHOTOGRAPHERS: George Grigus (food), Jean Moss (people)
People come to magazines for information, but ads don't always take advantage of that fact. Here's one that does, making point-by-point comparisons between Levolor blinds and "The Competition's Best Effort" which, on the close inspection a magazine ad permits, doesn't look any too hot. Copy briskly supplements the show-and-tell of the annotated photos with a measured dose of further detail, giving you plenty of evidence without snowing you under. And the ad smartly aims to make itself a point-of-sale piece as well as a magazine spread: "This ad is a guide to help you choose blinds. Feel free to tear it out and take it when you shop for blinds." Can't do that with a TV spot, can you?
LEVOLOR
AGENCY: Goldberg Moser O'Neill, San Francisco
CLIENT: Levolor Corp., Sunnyvale, Calif.
CREATIVE DIRECTORS: Mike Mosler, Brian O'Neill
ART DIRECTOR: Michael Wilde
COPYWRITER: David Woodside
PHOTOGRAPHER: Michele Clement
In a search for novel advertising approaches that has yielded a few triumphs and numerous embarrassments, liquor advertisers have gotten away from the old notion of a stiff drink as your reward for surviving the day's tribulations. Sales, in the meantime, have sagged as younger adults have adopted the lifestyle of the categorie's lifestyle ads without also drinking the liquor. This ad revives the drink-as-reward genre and shows how potent it can be when the execution is imaginative and well-crafted. The scene immediately engages your-sympathetic interest and then links it with the brand. If nothing else, you feel like having a drink just to celebrate the fact you're not the fellow with the briefcase.
WINDSOR CANADIAN WHISKEY
AGENCY: Fallon McElligott, Minneapolis
CLIENT: Windsor Distillery Co., Deerfield, Ill.
CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Pat Burnham
ART DIRECTOR: Tom Lichtenheld
COPYWRITER: John Stingley
PHOTOGRAPHER: Craig Perman
This ad does an exemplary job of getting the reader involved, from catchy headline to fold-on-the-dotted-line display of Lexus' crumple zone in a 30-mph collision. There's a good deal of information, but in bite-size chunks that won't put off the casual reader as a lengthy block of copy might. At the same time, auto safety is treated with a graphic panache that subdues the topic's usual sensible-shoes overtones. As such, the car shopper comes away feeling that Lexus eliminates any need to sacrifice style in pursuit of safety.
LEXUS
AGENCY: Team One Advertising, El Segundo, Calif.
CLIENT: Lexus Division of Toyota Motor Sales USA, Torrance, Calif.
CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Tom Cordner
ART DIRECTOR: John Boone
COPYWRITER: Ron Huey
PHOTOGRAPHER: Michael Ruppert
ILLUSTRATOR: Antar Dayal
Why would you pay the premium for an imported vodka when any mixer makes it indistinguishable in taste from the bargain brand? Because a stylish ad can add an emotional pleasure to drinking the fancier stuff. This striking visual also connects Finlandia to folks who have an outdoorsy lifestyle, to say the least. (Copy explains that the Okko and Kari families are getting together for their 22nd annual "block party" on Lake Puula, with the latter supplying the Finlandia.) It's an ingenious way of combating the aversion today's fitness-obsessed people may feel to drinking.
FINLANDIA VODKA
AGENCY: Goodby, Berlin & Silverstein, San Francisco
CLIENT: Palace Brands Co., Farmington, Conn.
CREATIVE DIRECTORS: Jeff Goodby, Rich Silverstein
ART DIRECTOR: Jeremy Postaer
COPYWRITER: Bob Kerstetter
PHOTOGRAPHER: Duncan Sim
Copyright Adweek L.P. (1993)