A.G. Edwards Goes National via CL Print, TV | Adweek
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A.G. Edwards Goes National via CL Print, TV

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CHICAGO Carmichael Lynch focuses on the values that helped A.G. Edwards exist for 117 years in the investment company's first national marketing campaign.

Print and television work from the Minneapolis agency breaks this week in financial and lifestyle publications and on news and lifestyle programming. Television ads, which will run in 15- and 30-second versions, present the company's values and client service. One 15-second TV spot focuses on the client's initials, noting that A stands for, "Always treat people the way you'd like to be treated," while G means, "Good rule for an investment company." The 30-second spots are more story-based, showing the bonds between A.G. Edwards brokers and their clients. In one spot, a client feels compelled to give his broker the shirt off his back as a reward for all the hard work. Another shows a client giving his financial consultant a hug.

A print ad also uses the "Always treat people the way you'd like to be treated" line, coupled with the question, "How's that for technical financial jargon?" Another headline: "Putting limits on the choices financial consultants can offer. To us that's like saying, 'Have anything on the menu you want as long as its a ham sandwich.'"

Both print and TV executions introduce "Fully invested in our clients" as the new tagline.

"Our approach is straightforward," said Peter Miller, executive vice president and director of sales and marketing for the St. Louis company, in a statement. "Our client is at the center of everything we do—both philosophically and structurally."

Over its 117-year history, A.G. Edwards has never had a national marketing campaign, instead relying on local advertising and word of mouth to build its customer base. The company hired Carmichael Lynch to develop its first advertising campaign last April following a review.

Spending for the account was not disclosed, but when CL won the business, sources estimated billings at $20 million.