Rebecca Romijn Flaunts Milk Mustache for Charity | Adweek Rebecca Romijn Flaunts Milk Mustache for Charity | Adweek
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Rebecca Romijn Flaunts Milk Mustache for Charity

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The nation’s milk processors have launched a social media-focused campaign that raises money for charity.

Called “Great Gallon to Give,” the campaign, by the New York office of Interpublic Group-owned Deutsch, promises to give away “more than three million servings [of milk] to help raise awareness of the important role milk plays in building strong families.” As part of the effort, Milk Processor Education Program (MilkPEP), the industry-backed group responsible for the National Milk Mustache “Got milk?” campaign, has tapped actress Rebecca Romijn as a spokeswoman.

Print ads, which break in Us Weekly and People magazines this Friday, have Romijn touting milk as “a naturally nutrient rich [drink]," as she is pictured with a milk mustache and holding her twin daughters. "Besides calcium, milk is packed with protein and B vitamins to help build strong families. Just one more thing to cherish,” the ad states.

The effort also includes a Facebook component where consumers can donate a “virtual gallon of milk” to loved ones in need. MilkPEP is donating $1 to Feeding America for every virtual milk gallon that’s sent, or a total of $100,00.

MilkPEP is also directing consumers to Whymilk.com to find out where its holding milk giveaway events. (The organization will distribute more than 200,000 gallons of milk in 20 markets across the country.) Visitors to the site can also register to receive a year’s worth of free milk, and the chance to win a downloadable coupon for a free milk purchase.

“We want to salute moms for all they do to help build strong families,” said Vivien Goodfrey, CEO of the MilkPEP effort. "Milk is an easy and affordable way for moms to celebrate their family and make sure they get the nutrients they need," she added.

The campaign follows an industry-wide trend to get Americans to choose healthier foods and beverages. In 2006, beverage companies cut down on the number of soft and sweet fruit drinks sold in schools. Meanwhile, food companies have been slowly scaling back the amount of sodium in their products, most recently as part of a program announced by the Bloomberg administration in New York City today.