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NBCU, Apple Revisit iTunes Deal

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NEW YORK NBC Universal, which earlier severed its agreement to make its programming available via the Apple iTunes store, has signed a new deal with Apple that will make popular NBC broadcast and cable shows available once again.

Those shows include Heroes, The Office, 30 Rock and Battlestar Gallactica. Customers of iTunes will be able to select from a complete list of NBC, Bravo, USA Network, Sci Fi Channel, Sleuth and NBC News programming. Shows will also be made available in high definition.

The standard-definition downloads will cost $1.99 per episode and the HD programs will be available for $2.99 per show.

Down the road, programming from NBCU networks Oxygen, Telemundo, mun2 and NBC Sports will also be available on iTunes.

Customers can purchase a season pass, allowing them to buy an entire season of programming at a discounted price. And NBCU is offering one free episode from each of its top series for the next two weeks.

The premiere episodes of Knight Rider, My Own Worst Enemy and Kath & Kim, NBC's new fall shows, will be available on iTunes one week before their broadcast premieres later this month and in October. All other episodes will be available the day after broadcast.

NBCU will also make episodes of its vintage series like The A-Team, Miami Vice, Kojak and the Alfred Hitchcock Hour, along with the original Battlestar Gallactica, available for 99 cents per program.

"We are thrilled that NBC is back on iTunes in time for the fall TV season," said Steve Jobs, Apple's CEO. "NBC has some of TV's most popular shows and now customers can purchase and download them from iTunes in standard definition or stunning HD."

"The return of our shows to iTunes is terrific news for everyone who loves television and the ease and convenience of Apple's iTunes," said Jeff Zucker, president and CEO, NBCU.

NBCU and Apple earlier parted ways because of a dispute over the nature of their revenue split.