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And, oddly for an online store trying to sell stuff, the gift's brand name is omitted.

In the second video, the joke is that Bee interviews a neurologist to get to the bottom of the attack phenomenon, and also watches a dude in a hospital gown have an attack while on the MRI table. It has some funny lines, the best being at the end when the "doctor" sees the eBay page and says, "Oh, they have Webkinz. I love them!" (At least there's a product to search for!)

The third is the worst. Bee sits at a table with some kid prey. Jason is first. "Think about the thing you want more than anything else for Christmas and then imagine that I got it for you," she tells him, giving him a present that turns out to be a toilet brush. Second is Dominique, cute and expectant, who gets one large shoe. By the time the third kid opens his meat thermometer, he's so confused that he actually looks thrilled.

It's not all sadism, After this setup, the kids are given "real" gifts, although we don't see much of the brand names. Dominique is so traumatized (or maybe just polite) she says, "I'll be happy for what it is," as she opens a stuffed animal. All three, by the way, go crazy over the second gifts. Hope there was a psychologist on set.

The part of the campaign that works well was the cheapest to produce and the most direct. The agency brought top mommy bloggers to eBay headquarters where they made (actually funny) videos with Bee in a campy sleigh—videos they could then post on their own sites. The mom bloggers know this is a reciprocal business, and are only too happy to spread the eBay joy.

I'm confused about the breadth and depth of new offerings at eBay and why I should go there over Amazon or Zappos. Maybe one of the mom bloggers can explain it. In the meantime, let's hope they remember that holiday gifts are supposed to be about their kids and not the attention it offers them—despite the fact that Bee, in the third video, asks Jason, "How much do you love me now?"

Rather than sending up the whole crazed mom genre, this promotes it. Thanks, eBay!