Magazine Hot List 2010 | Adweek Magazine Hot List 2010 | Adweek
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Magazine Hot List 2010

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How do you pick 10 magazines for a Hot List after a year such as 2009? By analyzing what each has done to expand beyond its core print business. That’s essentially the new golden rule of publishing: to no longer be simply a publisher.

New business extensions are de rigueur, from the obvious Web sites and mobile apps to conferences, TV shows, book lines, even awards programs and retail extensions. Time Inc.’s powerhouse People, No. 1 on this year’s Hot List, succeeds on virtually all those levels, proving a stalwart leader among celebrity-oriented titles even as the granddaddy of the genre.  Rodale’s Women’s Health, No. 2 on the Hot List, has cultivated a host of business offshoots that extend the brand as they attract new revenue. The same holds true for the 10 titles populating our 10 Under 60 Hot List, which features a few independent first timers like Cooking With Paula Deen and The Atlantic.

But this year’s Hot Lists tell only part of the story in this, our first-ever Magazine Special Issue. In times of trouble, innovation and risk taking is sometimes the best path to success, as Noreen O’Leary points out in her in-depth examination of Esquire editor in chief David Granger, our Editor of the Year. A flair for connection making paired with the ability to execute multiplatform deals have elevated our Executive of the Year, Meredith’s Jeannine Shao Collins, to business-side superstar—a story told by Lucia Moses in her usual crisp fashion. And freelancer Dan Ouellette relays the serendipity that reunited National Geographic’s Chris Johns with designer Rob Covey to take NationalGeographic.com to new heights. Lastly, don’t miss Vanity Fair editor in chief Graydon Carter’s thoughtful essay on the section’s closing page, explaining why print is not only far from dead but is also actually helping guide the future of media.


ADWEEKMEDIA'S 2010 MAGAZINE HOT LIST CONTENTS:

Magazine Hot List 2010: Top 10
While we didn’t abandon ad pages, we put greater focus on other measures of success this year, including circulation quality, with particular attention to newsstand sales, strength of engagement, smart brand extensions, and ability to find new ways to engage consumers and charge them for content.



Magazine Hot List 2010: 10 Under 60
With a can’t-miss combo of celebrity and food in easy-to-digest package, newbie Food Network Magazine tops 1 million circ in under a year and easily soars to top of our “small list.” With its “Cook Like a Star” promise, it’s a sure bet that the Hearst-Food Network partnership won’t be small for long. Rate base set to rise again in July/August.



Magazine Hot List 2010: Editor of the Year
If the Esquire editor in chief is in a good mood this early March day, it’s understandable. The Roger Ebert interview in the current issue is generating media buzz and Web traffic in advance of the film critic’s appearance on Oprah. Then there’s the upcoming National Magazine Awards. Granger is optimistic about his prospects.



Magazine Hot List 2010: Executive of the Year
There are lots of stories told in the halls of Meredith about Jeannine Shao Collins, and they usually go something like this: At an ANA conference a couple of years ago, she and a group of her associates cornered the chief marketing officer...




Magazine Hot List 2010: Web Site of the Year
Chris Johns and his lieutenants have been on a journey to expand beyond the printed page and deliver content through other venues, including TV, books and museums. Most impressive is Nat Geo’s Web site, which serves as the umbrella for all assets.




Creative Profile, Scott Dadich (Wired)
Scott Dadich had no idea that a low-budget side project he independently assumed last spring would change the way Wired digitally delivers its message. But, it did. The magazine’s award-winning creative director decided to develop a version of Wired for e-readers.




Q&A; BizWeek Editor Josh Tyrangiel
The former heir apparent at Time magazine who left that publication to become editor of BusinessWeek last November, is one happy guy. Read what the Renaissance man, now 37, considers his greatest achievement.