London Fog Clears Out of Clothing Conflict | Adweek London Fog Clears Out of Clothing Conflict | Adweek
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London Fog Clears Out of Clothing Conflict

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BOSTON - London Fog's lifestyle-oriented campaign aimed at wholesale buyers now shopping for fall lineups in Manhattan will be the last from Toth Design & Advertising.
The Concord, Mass., agency, which handled London Fog for the last seven years and through its various changes in management, resigned the estimated $2 million fashion account when its contract came up for renewal.
Another factor, however, is Toth's growing relationship with New York-based Nautica International, whose apparel line competes directly with London Fog's Pacific Trail brand, based in Seattle.
Toth recently completed a print campaign positioning the Nautica Sport Tech product line to young athletes with the tagline, "Never stop trying." Sources said last week that Toth will develop ads to introduce Nautica jeans this fall.
London Fog is now evaluating three agencies in different parts of the country: DiMassimo Brand Advertising in New York; Sasquatch of Portland, Ore.; and Miami-based Crispin Porter & Bogusky, according to client director of marketing Melissa Merlino. Sasquatch advertises London Fog's Pacific Trail brand.
The clothier expects to make a final agency decision within the next few weeks.
London Fog broke its fall 1999 advertising campaign, photographed by Kenneth Willardt, on bus shelters and kiosks in New York.
New executions for London Fog will begin appearing this fall outside New York, primarily in outdoor media venues, Merlino said. Markets will include Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Minneapolis, Pittsburgh, San Francisco and Seattle. A print schedule is under consideration, but few commitments have been made, she said.
Gone from the current campaign is the tagline that Toth originally conceived for the brand in 1994, "Weather or not."
Merlino described the current tagless campaign as "transitional," intended to broaden the brand's appeal by featuring younger men and women in contemporary settings.
"These ads bring the product into focus," Merlino said. A strobe light was employed in the photo shoots to accentuate the stylish casualwear and dress attire featured on the male and female models.
The advertising campaign covers men's and ladies' rainwear and outerwear that will be available in department stores this September. ¡