JWT Atlanta Hires Mullen's Perry Fair As Chief Creative Officer | Adweek JWT Atlanta Hires Mullen's Perry Fair As Chief Creative Officer | Adweek
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JWT Fills Top Creative Slot in Atlanta

New CCO Perry Fair also will oversee Texas offices

Perry Fair

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Perry Fair is heading back to Atlanta. Fair, who attended college and ad school in the city during the 1990s, is leaving Boston shop Mullen to become chief creative officer at JWT in Atlanta.

Fair, who’ll also oversee creative staffers in Houston and Dallas, fills a vacancy left by the July exit of Carl Warner. (Since then, creative directors Justin Baum, Roy Trimble, and Thurston Yates have managed the creative department.)

Atlanta’s top accounts include the U.S. Marine Corps, Transamerica, Scana Energy, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Houston handles Shell and Jiffy Lube, and Dallas serves as a technology hub, providing database management and analytics to marketers.

In his new role, Fair, 36, will lead some 50 staffers and partner with Rob Quish, who in the spring became CEO of the three offices. He’s expected to start next month. Quish, who considered a handful of candidates for the position, described Fair as a hard-working “doer” who “leads by example,” adding, “He’s a really driven guy, really ambitious and has consistently taken bigger and bigger jobs.”

Fair’s move south comes just eight months after he and R/GA’s Mauro Cavalletti joined Mullen as co-chief digital officers. Before that, Fair was an executive creative director at Grey in New York, where he focused on digital efforts and worked on DirecTV, E-Trade, and the NFL. His other brand experience includes Nissan, Gatorade, and Propel, having worked earlier in his career at TBWA\Chiat\Day, The True Agency, and Element 79.

Fair left Atlanta in 1999, after studying advertising at the Creative Circus and earning a bachelor’s in art from Clark Atlanta University. His first job was as an associate creative director at Burrell Communications in Chicago.