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Infiniti Executes Scott Brown Buy

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Scott Brown didn’t just change the course of the U.S. Congress. He’s influencing marketers as well.

Brown, a Massachusetts Republican who picked up Democrat Ted Kennedy’s old seat in the Senate in January, credited in part a “blast campaign” from Google that floods Google’s 1 million content network Web pages with display ads from one advertiser over a short period.

But Bruce Falck, head of the Google Content Network, said nonpolitical advertisers, including the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, ABC and some unnamed consumer packaged-goods brands, have used blast campaigns to support online contests or premieres. (Falck declined to specify which shows ABC promoted with such efforts.)

The latest major advertiser to employ a blast campaign is Infiniti, which bought up basketball-related content from March 14-18 to drive consumers to its sponsored NCAA “bracket challenge” contest on CBSSports.com. (Grand prize: a 2011 Infiniti M.)

The buy, which also included a YouTube homepage masthead placement, netted 80 million impressions over that time, Falck said.

A Google rep said that the program, which was executed by OMD and also included a buy on Yahoo, resulted in 154,000 signups for the contest.

Kathy Roznowski, senior media manager at Infiniti, said doing the buy in a short burst worked out better than spreading it out over a longer period of time. “Having a big faucet and then letting it go into a river is a lot better than a trickle stream,” she said.

Christopher Actis, svp and group media director at MediaVest, said he’s starting to see interest in blast campaigns beyond politics. “It makes sense if you’re driving action in and around specific time periods and specific locations,” he said. “This is kind of a unique strategy that’s just emerging.”