Fahlgren May Add NAPA Parts Ohio-Based Shop to Compete for Account's Creative Portion | Adweek Fahlgren May Add NAPA Parts Ohio-Based Shop to Compete for Account's Creative Portion | Adweek
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Fahlgren May Add NAPA Parts Ohio-Based Shop to Compete for Account's Creative Portion

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Fahlgren could corral NAPA's entire $25 million account in light of a review brought on by management changes at lead creative shop WestWayne.

"[WestWayne] has had a lot of senior changes of people working on our account, and we want to make sure that we're getting the level of service that we should," said Patricia White, retail marketing manager for NAPA, the National Automotive Parts Association.

White declined to elaborate on the agency management changes that led to the review, as did executives at WestWayne.

Fahlgren, headquartered in Dublin, Ohio, handles the Atlanta-based company's media and online creative duties, and has been invited to participate in the creative review, White said. The agency handles NAPA's media from Atlanta, but creative assignments are coordinated through the Fahlgren's office near Columbus, Ohio.

Executives at Fahlgren's Atlanta and Dublin offices confirmed that the shop will pitch to win WestWayne's portion of the account. "We have the opportunity to grow our business," said John Fahlgren., vice president of business development. WestWayne has been invited to defend the business, White said, and an agency representative confirmed the Atlanta office will participate in the review.

White said that she had been "contacted by practically every agency in Atlanta" about the account. Among the shops NAPA contacted was Atlanta-based Sawyer Riley Compton. While making no strict geographic requirements, White said that the company prefers an Atlanta presence for its agency.

WestWayne last year produced several humorous TV executions for NAPA, including an "Indiana Jones"-style spot that featured a NAPA service representative climbing over and under a moving SUV to find a problem.

Recently, however, NAPA moved away from humor. A soft-focus spot that aired before the Super Bowl emphasized using NAPA products to ensure loved ones' safety.

The creative product itself is not the cause of the review, White said. "Nobody here has any complaint about the quality of [creative] work we're getting [from WestWayne]," White said.

A WestWayne art director who worked on the NAPA business, Rodney Westbury, recently moved to Blue Sky in Atlanta.