DDB and sister shop Tribal DDB have replaced Venables Bell & Partners as lead agency on Intel | Adweek
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DDB, Tribal DDB Take Lead on Intel

Win follows pitch vs. Venables Bell
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Account shifts are fair play, right? Two years after Venables Bell & Partners replaced McCann Erickson on Intel’s corporate image account, Venables Bell has been usurped by another shop.

DDB and sister shop Tribal DDB will create the next round of ads in Intel's global "Sponsors of Tomorrow" campaign, which Venables Bell introduced in 2009, an Intel representative confirmed on Tuesday. As such, DDB/Tribal DDB now leads Intel's master brand efforts. Venables Bell remains on Intel's team, however, working on product-specific ads in four distinct areas, the rep said.

The new "Sponsors" work is expected to break in the third quarter. Intel’s shift came after the company considered creative concepts from both DDB/Tribal DDB and Venables Bell.

“As far as breakthrough ideas, Tribal (and DDB) won out in the review. But the fact that VB is doing work on some pretty sexy areas absolutely bodes well for them,” the rep said.

The DDB/Tribal DDB work in development "is not going to be a drastic change," the rep added. "We're still going to have elements of what we call 'geek humor.' And, depending on the actual [executions], not everything is going to be creative for a laugh."

DDB's crack at the global work comes after Tribal DDB completed a creative project for the Santa Clara, Calif.-based Intel. The project, which included online, outdoor, print, and cinema ads, centered on Intel's smart TV offering. The campaign broke in September and ran through January.

A past relationship opened the door to the smart TV assignment, which also followed a pitch. Johan Jervoe, director of creative services and digital marketing at Intel, is a former vp of global marketing at McDonald’s—a longtime DDB client.

Global media spending on Intel was not immediately available. In the U.S. alone last year, Intel spent more than $50 million in media, according to Nielsen. That figure does't include online outlays.