CPG Brand: Twitter Vine Took 5 Minutes to Make | Adweek
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CPG: Twitter Vine Took 5 Minutes to Make

Brands flock to new shiny object from the social site

Twitter's new Vine app—which lets companies publish six-second GIF-looking videos—has piqued interest in techies, showing up as a trending topic on the social site for much of the last 30 hours. Brand marketers seem equally abuzz, as numerous companies like Red Vines and Al-Monitor have already produced Vine clips.

But is the juice worth the squeeze? That's going to be debatable until it's clear whether or not the app helps brands market on Twitter in a more visual way. But in the meantime, per Red Vines media rep and social lead Michael Kelly, the push to produce a Vine shouldn't callus marketers' keyboarding fingertips.

"It took all of maybe five minutes," Kelly explained. "We have a strong following on Twitter and look to put out content that people want to interact with. When Vine dropped, we had to get into the mix. So we put it together and got it out there."

His decades-old CPG brand has 46,000 Twitter followers and has placed a premium on social media marketing in the last three years. Kelly thinks that Vine makes Twitter more like Tumblr, which might increase the micro-blogging site's appeal to Gen Y consumers.

"Part of what we are seeing is that Tumblr has exploded with activity among younger millennials," he said. "Their parents are on Facebook and Twitter; so that's not cool anymore. When you look at how younger people use Tumblr, GIFs—like what you see with Vine—are the lifeblood of that site."

Edward Felsenthal, CEO of Al-Monitor, also rushed up a Twitter Vine for his brand, featuring a look inside the company's Washington, D.C. headquarters. He said his content site—which focuses on Middle Eastern news—plans to create Vines with its columnists in Turkey, Israel, Lebanon and Palestine during the coming days.

"What we like about Vine is it's a window into something larger, which is what we’re aiming to do at Al-Monitor," Felsenthal explained. "It's a six-second window, but it's a window."

And recently, plenty of industry players tapped at its panes:


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