Advertisement

Coca-Cola's Zico Launches First Work From BSSP

Expanding coconut water brand gets ad campaign to match
A woman lifts weights in screengrab from a new Zico ad.

Coconut water Zico, under new majority ownership, is broadening its ad strategy.

The brand Monday launched its first national advertising campaign since Coca-Cola took a majority stake in the coconut water company last year (It first acquired a minority investment in 2009). The beverage conglomerate at the end of February 2013 began distributing Zico’s products nationally.

It’s also the brand’s first work from new agency Butler, Shine, Stern & Partners.

BSSP announced earlier this year it had won the Zico account. The brand says it's spending between $2 million and $5 million dollars on the campaign, which includes outdoor ads in major markets including New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Atlanta, as well as online ads.

The campaign features a cast of offbeat, high-energy characters offering up bursts of encouragement, meant to personify the boost—or "Oomph"—that the brand says its products give consumers. The writing also aims to amuse, and in some instances, more or less succeeds. A stereotypically mustached minor league baseball coach, for example, appears in one spot, wearing yoga pants. 

In other moments, the jokes feel a little familiar. The chest-thumping yell of a shirtless mud-caked athlete is reminiscent of Terry Crew’s tenor for Old Spice. And a spoon-shaking grandmother isn’t the first cranky ancestor a brand has used as a pitchwoman in recent years—Droga5’s “yiayia” work for Kraft brand Athenos orbits around a similar gag.

Also among Zico's motley crew: a living-room fitness freak offering pseudo-philosophy. "Life is only hard when your muscles are not."

Check out a handful of the many clips below. 

CLARIFICATION: This article has been updated to reflect the following change: An earlier version stated that Coca-Cola purchased Zico in April 2012. Coca-Cola first purchased a minority stake in 2009, and increased its investment to a 51 percent majority stake in 2012.

Advertisement

Advertisement